Articles on Child development

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Social connections at camp can help build your child’s social network. (Shutterstock)

Summer camp: How to help your child make the most of it

With summer in full swing and kids flocking to camps across Canada, how do you assess whether your child's having a good experience? Some suggestions on how to evaluate what will work for your child.
When played in moderation, electronic games can be beneficial for children’s learning and development. shutterstock

Electronic games: how much is too much for kids?

Low-to-moderate use of electronic games may have a positive effect on children's later academic achievement, but overuse can be detrimental.
About 3% of babies are born with birth defects, when there is a problem with how they develop in the womb. from www.shutterstock.com

Why we don’t know what causes most birth defects

We still don't know what's behind four out of every five birth defects. But that can change.
It can be a tough time for children going through the physical and emotional changes of puberty. And if they enter puberty early, the health impacts can stay with them for life. from www.shutterstock.com

Poor kids hit puberty sooner and risk a lifetime of health problems

Shape-shifting bodies. Cracking voices. Hairs sprouting in new places. Why do some children enter puberty early?
Don’t underestimate what I get about the world around me. Baby image via www.shutterstock.com.

Children understand far more about other minds than long believed

A revolution in the tools and techniques developmental psychologists use to investigate kids' knowledge and capabilities is rewriting what we know about how and when children understand their world.
Children around the world are susceptible to stereotypes. World Bank Photo Collection

Combatting stereotypes: How to talk to your children

For young children, how we speak is often more important than what we say. Even 'positive' generalizations can lead children to adopt negative stereotypes.
I can’t see you, you can’t see me. Child image via www.shutterstock.com.

Young children are terrible at hiding – psychologists have a new theory why

Little kids cover their own eyes and feel hidden, even if they're still fully visible. New research suggests this doesn't mean children can't understand others' perspectives, as had been assumed.

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