Articles on child health

Displaying 1 - 20 of 61 articles

Dyspraxia is a neurodevelopmental disorder, meaning it affects brain function and unfolds as the person grows. somsak nitimongkolchai/Shutterstock

Explainer: what is dyspraxia and how is it different to clumsiness?

Most of us learn to tie our shoelaces, dress ourselves and eat with cutlery with relative ease. But for children with dyspraxia, these tasks are incredibly difficult to master.
Trachoma disappeared from most of Australia 100 years ago as individual and community hygiene improved.

Why is trachoma blinding Aboriginal children when mainstream Australia eliminated it 100 years ago?

Trachoma easily spreads from one child to another through infected eye and nose secretions. A person may have up to 40 episodes of reinfection during childhood.
Parents’ role as medical decision-makers is sometimes questioned when they don’t choose the recommended treatment for their child. from

When parents disagree with doctors on a child’s treatment, who should have the final say?

It is ethical for doctors to accept a treatment option parents want – providing it is good enough – rather than insisting on what they believe is the best possible treatment for the child.
Not just a wives’ tale: growing pains are common in kids. from

Health Check: are growing pains real?

Growing pains are the most common childhood musculoskeletal condition resulting in frequent visits to healthcare professionals.
A survey of parents found many weren’t keen on their kids lifting weights, but the evidence says they should. from

Health Check: should children and adolescents lift weights?

A recent study found while parents are positive about their children engaging in aerobic activities (running, playing sports), they have much more negative views when it comes to strength exercises.
Pregnant women in three Australian cities are not told that lead exposure during pregnancy is linked to miscarriage and early delivery. Flickr/Luca Montanari

Pregnant women and parents misled about dangers of living with lead pollution

Parents in three Australian states are being given misleading advice about the dangers of lead to babies and small children – including failing to warn pregnant women about miscarriage risks.

Top contributors