Articles on Health disparities

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Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis on April 3, 1968, giving the last speech of his life. He addressed social inequalities, discussing the low pay of garbage workers in that city. Charles Kelly/AP File Photo

How unjust social structures help some but harm others

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis. At the root of the injustice that King preached about is structural inequalities. An expert explains what that means.
Providing tools to help African-American men with prostate cancer make decisions about care can make a big difference. michaeljung/Shutterstock.com

Doctors need to talk through treatment options better for black men with prostate cancer

Prostate cancer outcomes have differed between black men and other ethnic groups for decades. Could improving the way doctors talk and share information with black patients make a difference?
From left to right: Toya Tolson, Shawnte’ Spriggs, Sophia Harrison, Marcella Wright and Deborah Dyson. These women are aging with HIV, sometimes with other diseases and always with other challenges. Aamir Khuller

African-American women with HIV often overlooked, under-supported

More people than ever are living with HIV, but people may overlook the fact that many of these long-term survivors are African-American women. They face unique social and health challenges.
An African American man in a hospital bed. Studies show that pain in African American patients is often not addressed. pixelheadphoto/digitalskillet

Dying while black: Perpetual gaps exist in health care for African-Americans

Gaps in care and outcomes between African-Americans and white patients is a major concern to those who care about fairness in health care. Gaps in care also exist at end of life, too.
Mourners wait to attend the funeral of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Virginia, Aug. 16, 2017 after Heyer was killed attending a rally to protest white nationalism. Julia Rendleman/AP Photo

Why bigotry is a public health problem

As death tolls rise from hate crimes, a psychiatrist wonders: Is it time to treat bigotry like a disease?
Discrimination creates gaps in care between white and black men. Rawpixel/Shutterstock.com

How anti-black bias in white men hurts black men’s health

White men hold more racial bias toward blacks than white women do, and this harms blacks' health in significant ways. It not only can lead to some diseases but also impedes treatment.
Students at Hampton University celebrate at graduation on May 9. 2010. Studies suggest, however, that the benefits African American students accrue from education will be fewer than those of whites. J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Why it’s hard for blacks to pull themselves up by bootstraps when it comes to health

Many in the US believe that all people can gain riches and education simply by working hard. Here's why that is not true for those have been denied rights and privileges for generations.
African-American women are about three times more likely to be diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease. mangostock/Shutterstock.com

A new clue into treatments for triple negative breast cancer, a mean disease

Researchers have long been looking for clues into how to treat triple negative breast cancer. Could fighter blood cells that infiltrate the tumor provide insight?
Debbie Ziegler, mother of the late Brittany Maynard, in Sacramento in September 2015, encouraging the passage of California’s End-of-Life Options Act. Maynard, who had brain cancer, had to move to Oregon so she could end her life legally in 2014. AP Photo/Carl Costas

Death as a social privilege? How aid-in-dying laws may be revealing a new health care divide

People who seek aid in dying tend to be white men older than 65, a new analysis shows. While this could be due to religious views, here's why it could also be because of lack of access.
A homeless camp in Los Angeles, where homelessness has risen 23 percent in the past year, in May 2017. AP Photo/Richard Vogel

Why poverty is not a personal choice, but a reflection of society

Americans, an independent group, tend to believe that people can "pull themselves up by their boot straps." Yet bigger forces are at play in a person's ability to gain education, a good job and money.
White men gain more health benefits from employment than do black men and women. Angela Waye/from www.shutterstock.com

Employment helps white men’s health more than women and blacks

Employment is good for health, but it is even better for white men than for others. And unemployment is worse for white men than others. Could these findings shine light on our political situation?

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