Articles on Online learning

Displaying 1 - 20 of 60 articles

Following a negotiation impasse, Ontario public secondary teachers walked off the job on a one-day strike. Here, striking teachers are seen outside the Toronto District School Board office on Yonge Street in Toronto, Dec. 4, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Ontario’s high school e-learning still hasn’t addressed students with special needs

Ontario high school labour negotiations broke down over student quality of learning — including mandatory e-learning. Ontario has yet to explain how this will work for students with special needs.
If Ontario rolls out mandatory high school e-learning with no in-person class hours, each student will lose 440 hours of face-to-face class time. (Shutterstock)

In Doug Ford’s e-learning gamble, high school students will lose

For high school students, e-learning is best introduced in face-to-face classes where teachers can meet a greater range of learning needs -- not as a completely online experience.
Bernie Williams, right, a women’s advocate in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, embraces Carmen Paterson while testifying at the final day of hearings at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Richmond, B.C., on April 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Can we really teach ‘Indigenizing’ courses online?

University "Indigenization" efforts using Massive Open Online Courses promise to reach wide audiences. They also raise critical questions about how to embody Indigenous ways of knowing and relating.
English language minority students can struggle to express themselves authentically in online courses if they are new to the conventions of Western discourse and written academic style. (Shutterstock)

Online learning punishes minority students, but video chats can help

The discourse and structure of online learning can exclude English language minority students. Techniques such as video chats, "safe houses" and content-focused grading can support their success.
Paper or tablet? Megan Trace

Do students lose depth in digital reading?

With the surge in e-books and digital devices, one concern has been whether students are learning as much. Research shows that some crucial elements of learning are indeed being lost.
Low-income teens are unable to participate in social media conversations of their wealthier peers. Phone image via www.shutterstock.com

Teens without smartphones encounter a new digital divide

With low-income kids unable to participate in the social media conversations of their wealthier peers, a new form of digital inequity is emerging.
Tablets can be a novel reading experience for parent and child. Goodluz/Shutterstock

What we know about tablets and how your child learns to read

A recent US survey commissioned by the children’s books publisher Scholastic found that 65% of 6-11 year olds prefer to read print books even when e-books are available on tablets. In the UK, a National…

Top contributors

More