Articles on Quebec

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Cannabis plants are seen during a tour of a Hexo Corp. production facility in October 2018 in Masson-Angers, Québec. The province is raising the legal cannabis age to 21. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Québec is wrong to raise its legal cannabis age to 21

Québec government policy is working against the objectives of cannabis legalization.
Québec politician Catherine Dorion has been criticized for wearing informal attire in the provincial legislative chamber. Québec national assembly

It’s 2019: What’s the proper way for politicians to dress?

Québec Solidaire politician Catherine Dorion sparked controversy with her garb in the provincial legislature but this issue has caused uproars in parliaments around the world.
Bloc Québecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet greets his supporters during a celebration on election night in Montréal. Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press

How do we explain the return of the Bloc Québécois?

The Bloc Québécois was written off as politically dead before it aligned itself with the CAQ government's law on secularism. Now it's moved into third place in Parliament in a stunning comeback.
Bloc supporters react as results come in on federal election night in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

How the Liberals paved the way for the Bloc’s return

The Bloc surged because the Liberal campaign focused on attacking premiers from other provinces and promised initiatives that already exist in Québec.
Jean Truchon, right, looks on as lawyer Jean-Pierre Menard gives their reaction to a Québec judge overturning parts of provincial and federal laws on medically assisted dying on September 12, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

The latest medical assistance in dying decision needs to be appealed: Here’s why

One judge must not be allowed to curtail parliament’s power to promote broader societal interests and protect people who are elderly, ill and disabled.
The media and politicians with a vested interest pit provinces against each other. But a study shows there are lots of differences of opinion within provinces, and geography doesn’t matter much. Here Quebec residents protest against the government’s Bill 21, which bans religious headgear, in April 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Canada: Is it really a country divided?

Despite decades of bickering and hand-wringing, Canada continues on. National tensions, in and of themselves, are not leading us to poor policy outcomes.
People hold up signs as they march during a demonstration in Montreal, April 7, 2019, in opposition to the Quebec government’s newly tabled Bill 21. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Clashing rights: Behind the Québec hijab debate

The proposed secular law (Bill 21) in the province of Québec appears to be directed primarily against Montreal and Québec City, and reflects a fear of strangers in Québec’s more homogeneous regions.
Honouring religious freedom and behaving faithfully in public not only protect the rights of individuals but also safeguard the integrity of democratic governments. Peter Hershey/Unsplash

A cautionary tale: The unintended consequences of Québec’s Bill 21

Respecting religious freedom not only protects the rights of individuals, it safeguards the integrity and accountability of democratic governments.
Quebec Premier François Legault stands in front of the crucifix in the provincial legislature where he announced the religious symbol will be removed. Québec is both the most homogeneous province from a religious point of view and the most detached from its religious culture. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jacques Boissinot

Secularism: Québecers are religious about it

Many Canadians are puzzled by Québec's law banning some civil servants from wearing religious symbols. A Québec sociologist explains the law is rooted in the province's troubled history with religion.
Premier François Legault, left, and Simon Jolin-Barrette, minister of immigration, diversity and inclusiveness, are seen at the provincial legislature in late March 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jacques Boissinot

The supposed benefits of Québec secularism bill don’t outweigh the costs

While few would deny secularism and religious neutrality are legitimate goals, they don’t justify Bill 21's undue restriction of minority rights.
Coalition Avenir Québec leader François Legault on the campaign trail last September before the election that saw his party form a majority government.

In Québec, Christian liberalism becomes the religious authority

The language of the neutral and secular state in Bill 21, like its precursors, presumes an invisible Christian default for the rules around public expressions of religiosity.
A French-speaking Canadian volunteer in Haiti part of the volunteer group EDV that helped recovery efforts after the earthquake in early June 2010. Emma Taylor/Wikimedia

How Francophone scholarship deepened our understanding of democracy and social change

Scholars such as Alfred Sauvy, Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan and Frantz Fanon wrote in French, but their work greatly contributed to our understanding of democracy and social change in all contexts.
Feb. 26 is World Spay Day, and spaying or neutering pets has many benefits. Shutterstock

World Spay Day highlights the importance of fixing our pets

Neutering or spaying pets has additional benefits beyond population control; these benefits include extending their lifespan, improving their health and reducing risk of certain diseases.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks about the federal government’s newly imposed carbon tax at an event in Toronto in October 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Rethinking Canada’s climate policy from the ground up

Canada's top-down approach to designing its climate policy has failed. It needs to find ways to engage with individuals.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford arrives to speak in Toronto on Dec. 12, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Doug Ford is wrong about minority-language services

Ontario's premier is drawing faulty parallels between Franco-Ontarians and Anglo-Quebecers when it comes to the services available to them in each province.

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