Republican Party

Displaying 1 - 20 of 62 articles

A mosquito. Jaime Saldarriaga/Reuters

What really threatens America: Zika, cancer or ISIS?

The unfolding information about the Zika virus and saddening images of babies infected with microcephaly should really scare us all. The disease has spread “explosively” throughout the Americas, with 32…
U.S. Senator Ted Cruz speaks at the Fox News debate in Des Moines, Iowa on January 28. Carlos Barria/Reuters

Politics of resentment on full display at GOP debate

According to an expert in political rhetoric, we shouldn't underestimate the power of the candidates who can skillfully tap into voter resentments.
Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Raleigh, North Carolina on December 4 2015. Jonathan Drake/Reuters

The rhetorical brilliance of Trump the demagogue

An expert on American political rhetoric breaks down Donald Trump's rhetorical prowess, pointing to the various techniques the candidate has mastered.
Former New York Governor George Pataki: “I think part of the problem is the…way Republicans think about climate change.” Rick Wilking/Reuters

Breaking the link between a conservative worldview and climate skepticism

In the last Republican presidential debate, two candidates spoke out on climate change – a sign that the tide is turning away from linking conservative policies with denying climate change.
Representative Paul Ryan arrives to talk to the media after being nominated for speaker of the House of Representatives on Capitol Hill in Washington October 28 2015. Yuri Gripas/Reuters

What should we make of Paul Ryan’s fondness for Ayn Rand?

Saying that Ayn Rand had some useful economic and political ideas does not, however, compel Ryan to adopt her entire philosophy lock, stock and barrel.
From outside the US, Donald Trump might seem a buffoon who cannot be seriously thought of as president. EPA/Erik S. Lesser

US politics set for change without regeneration

The generation who grew up during the Cold War and came to age through the unrest of Vietnam and the civil rights movement still dominate American politics.
Ninian Reed flickr

The political work of the Confederate flag

Public opinion on the flag may have shifted with lightning speed, but how did it hold on as long as it did? The answer has to do with how it served both Democratic and Republican parties alike.

Top contributors

More