Articles on Science communication

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There’s more to it than political beliefs. Buttons image via

Why do science issues seem to divide us along party lines?

Social scientists investigate when and why liberals and conservatives mistrust science. The apparent split may be more about cultural and personal beliefs than feelings about science itself.
Ben Goldacre says that greater transparency on research findings could increase the public’s faith in essential medicines. Shutterstock

Speaking with: Bad Pharma author Ben Goldacre about how bad research hurts us all

Bad Pharma author Ben Goldacre about how bad research hurts us all. The Conversation, CC BY36.4 MB (download)
Darren Saunders speaks with Bad Pharma author Ben Goldacre about bad medical research reporting, and how greater transparency in research practices could improve public trust in science and medicine.
Scientists themselves may be the key to finding the right balance. Scales image via

Accurate science or accessible science in the media – why not both?

The public loses when their only choices are inaccessible, impenetrable journal articles or overhyped click-bait about science. Scientists themselves need to step up and help bridge the divide.
Printer George Howe shows the first edition of the Sydney Gazette to Governor Philip Gidley King, in a feature window at the Mitchell Library. Reproduced with permission of the Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales, Digital Order Number: a6509002

The science issues this election are as old as the Australian media

What science issues did Australia's first newspaper - edited by a convict - discuss in its letter pages? The same ones we talk about today: the environment, education and health.
There’s a lot of incentive to hype scientific findings but in the end nobody wins. Overselling findings can undermine the authority of scientists as well as the credibility of the sources and ultimately deceive or even endanger the public. Shutterstock

The danger of overselling science

Sometimes scientists, the media and the general public inadvertently conspire to oversell science, and that is bad for us all.
If someone is spouting pseudo-science, should scientists risk legitimising them by getting into a debate with them? Shutterstock

Should scientists engage with pseudo-science or anti-science?

Some scientists refuse to debate or appear with those they consider to be unscientific. But is this the best approach to combat anti-science narratives?
This is what happens when science writing gets too turgid. Shutterstock

How not to write about science

Science can be fascinating and exciting. But much science writing is dull and obscure. Here are some of the tricks scientists often use to suck the joy out of science.

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