Articles on Statistics

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Some things are just tricky to measure. Flickr/Patty O'Hearn Kickham

It’s not so easy to gain the true measure of things

How useful is the information you get from the measure of any thing? That depends on what you chose measure in the first place, and that's not always clear.
Scientists are facing a reproducibility crisis. Y Photo Studio/shutterstock.com

How big data has created a big crisis in science

Science is in a reproducibility crisis. This is driven in part by invalid statistical analyses that happen long after the data are collected – the opposite of how things are traditionally done.
A new statistical test lets scientists figure out if two groups are similar to one another. paleontologist natural/shutterstock.com

The equivalence test: A new way for scientists to tackle so-called negative results

A new statistical test lets researchers search for similarities between groups. Could this help keep new important findings out of the file drawer?
Sometimes statistical analysis suggests a result is significant – but actually in real life it means very little. Marlon Lara/Unsplash

What it means when scientists say their results are ‘significant’

What do stats really mean in the real world? Here's an example from leukaemia research to help you identify if a result really is important.
Most Canadians have a higher probability of dying of heart disease than winning something in the McDonald’s Monopoly game. THE CONVERSATION CANADA/Scott White

McDonald’s Monopoly: A statistician explains the real odds of winning

McDonald's Canada has brought back its popular Monopoly game. A statistician explains the odds of winning the top prizes and how that compares to the odds we confront in everyday life.
Chicago is often invoked in political debates on crime. Scott Cornell/shutterstock.com

Why the US needs better crime reporting statistics

What's really the most dangerous American city? The way crimes are currently counted in the US can easily confuse and mislead.

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