Articles on Big data

Displaying 1 - 20 of 103 articles

An increasingly diverse array of geospatial, network and time-series data is being used to generate new perspectives and insights. Here we see air traffic in England and Wales visualised over satellite images. https://www.flickr.com/photos/natspressoffice/

Quantamentals, signal surfing and fast walkers: mapping the rise of weird data

People in all manner of professions from economists and real estate agents to stockbrokers and doctors are beginning to recognise the huge potential and power of unconventional data.
There could be plenty of demand from the space tour guides of the near future. Flickr/Pedro Vezini

Want to be a space tour guide? Apply here… in 2025

Space tourists will need someone to show them around. This is just one of several jobs that currently don't exist but are expected to be a reality with in a decade.
Imagine where working together on open data can get us? Puzzle pieces image via www.shutterstock.com.

Expanding citizen science models to enhance open innovation

This method of crowdsourcing science legwork is ready to expand into other disciplines – and maybe the amateurs themselves can start calling some of the shots.
Predicting whether a child will commit a crime before their 18th birthday is fraught with problems. Shutterstock/Tomsickova Tatyana

Can we predict who will turn to crime?

Machine learning is being used to see if it's possible to predict whether someone will commit a crime some time in the future. But does this risk condemning people for a crime they haven’t committed?
Perhaps your career path is paved with big data. Steve Johnson

Big data jobs are out there – are you ready?

Most industries tap into big data these days – meaning more and more jobs are opening up in this field. Here's some background on the skills and qualities you'd use as a modern big data professional.
Jane Jacobs holds up documentary evidence at a 1961 press conference during the campaign to save the West Village. Wikimedia Commons

What might Jane Jacobs say about smart cities?

In an age of data-driven urban science, we need to remember how Jane Jacobs gave voice to the multiple languages, meanings, experiences and knowledge systems of a vibrant city.
Not all data are the same. Image sourced from Shutterstock.com

Data access inquiry casts the net far too wide

The Productivity Commission's inquiry into access and use of public and private data risks failing to achieve anything meaningful.
The ‘Lose Yourself in Melbourne’ ad was onto something: instead of being directed to the fastest or shortest route, some people might want to take a diverting detour. 'It's Easy to Lose Yourself in Melbourne', Tourism Victoria

Why we should design smart cities for getting lost

If smart cities run on big data and algorithms that channel only 'relevant' information and opinions to us, how do we maintain the diversity of ideas and possibilities that drives truly smart cities?

Top contributors

More