Articles on Uluru statement

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Siena Stubbs, 17, from Yirrkala in East Arnhem Shire reads the Imagination Declaration on behalf of a group of Indigenous and non-Indigenous students at the 2019 Garma Festival. AIME

The Imagination Declaration: young Indigenous Australians want to be heard – but will we listen?

A group of school students have just shown what real leadership looks like on Indigenous issues – and you'll hear more about their ideas in coming months at your local school, childcare centre or uni.
“We have not yet had true reconciliation, and a country that is not truly reconciled is not truly whole,” says Anthony Albanese at the Garma Festival. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Albanese says Voice must be in the Constitution

Anthony Albanese says an Indigenous Voice must be enshrined in the Constitution, making it difficult to see how he and Scott Morrison will be able to agree on a referendum question.
The Queensland treaty process is still in the early stages and negotiations will not begin for several years. But it’s still a historic step forward for Indigenous communities. Tracey Nearmy/AAP

As the federal government debates an Indigenous Voice, state and territories are pressing ahead

Queensland has become the latest state or territory to embark on an Indigenous treaty process. But for lasting progress to be made, the federal government cannot shirk its responsibility.
Professor Megan Davis is an independent expert member of the United Nations Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. AAP/RICHARD WAINWRIGHT

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Megan Davis on a First Nations Voice in the Constitution

Megan Davis on a First Nations Voice in the Constitution. The Conversation, CC BY31.4 MB (download)
Megan Davis says the idea of including an Indigenous Voice in the Constitution is being rejected on an understanding that "simply isn't true" but believes Australia has the "capacity to correct this".
The government’s proposal for a referendum will only happen if it can get consensus on the content of what would go into the constitution, and there’s a high probability of a favourable outcome. Dan Peled/AAP

Grattan on Friday: When it comes to Indigenous recognition, Ken Wyatt will have to close multiple gaps

It would be another miracle if the Morrison government managed to have a referendum passed to give Australia's Indigenous people constitutional recognition.
In his first major policy address, Ken Wyatt noted how previous governments have failed Indigenous Australians with a ‘top-down, command and control approach.’ Rohan Thomson/AAP

Listening with ‘our ears and our eyes’: Ken Wyatt’s big promises on Indigenous affairs

Ken Wyatt's promise of a referendum on constitutional recognition within three years marks a dramatic shift from the Turnbull government's rejection of the Uluru Statement of the Heart.
Today we’re asking: what Queensland seats are the ones to watch on election night? How to give Indigenous Australians a true voice in politics? And how can we improve trust in the political system? Shutterstock

The myth of ‘the Queensland voter’, Australia’s trust deficit, and the path to Indigenous recognition

The myth of ‘the Queensland voter’, Australia’s trust deficit, and the path to Indigenous recognition. The Conversation122 MB (download)
Today, an election-themed episode about some of the biggest policy questions Australia faces, featuring Indigenous academic lawyer Eddie Synot and political scientist Anne Tiernan.
The Coalition government has rejected the Uluru Statement’s call for an Indigenous voice to Parliament, just one of many disappointments for Indigenous peoples. Jeremy Ng/AAP

No matter who is elected, more work remains on women’s rights and Indigenous issues

Some of the Coalition government's initiatives on women and Indigenous issues have been more successful than others. Labor is promising much more.
The challenge on Indigenous rights is to achieve reform that goes beyond limited understandings of these issues as being symbolic or practical. AAP/Dan Peled

The Uluru statement showed how to give First Nations people a real voice – now it’s time for action

Instead of paying lip service to promoting Indigenous Australians' rights as First Nations, the next federal government should be guided by the Uluru Statement from the Heart to make real progress.
Abbott’s previous policies on Indigenous issues were characterised by funding cuts, exclusions and silencing – all of which makes his role as envoy highly questionable to Indigenous communities. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Why Tony Abbott’s appointment as Indigenous envoy was a diplomatic blunder and policy failure

The proposals Abbott has pushed as envoy - more police in Indigenous communities and learning in English - demonstrates his ignorance and unsuitability for the job.
Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, receive a “hongi,” a traditional Māori welcome, from Māori elders on the lawns of Government House in Wellington, New Zealand in October 2018. In New Zealand, Māori elect members to parliament from designated Māori constituencies – and the right to participate offers more than the ‘duty to consult’ in Canada. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Lessons from New Zealand on the ‘duty to consult’ First Nations

In New Zealand, sovereignty is disputed, but the Maori case for sharing it with settlers underscores the limits of First Nations consultation in Canada.
Constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians has stalled. It’s time to take a new approach. Alan Porritt/AAP

A new way to recognise an Indigenous nation in Australia

A federal system could deliver on three of the four key elements of the Uluru Statement. Plus, all the elements already exist or are in the works in Australia.

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