War crimes

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South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma being welcomed on his arrival in Khartoum by Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir earlier this year. Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Leaving the ICC won’t absolve South Africa of its legal obligations

South Africa's withdrawal from the ICC could have mere symbolic value. The country will continue to have obligations to binding decisions taken by the UN Security Council – including those pertaining to the court.
There are lessons to be learnt about the ICC from the Kellogg-Briand Pact, signed in 1928. It failed to prevent the outbreak of war but brought war criminals to justice later. Reuters

ICC: sad lesson of lofty ideals trumped by reality repeats itself

The ICC has not lived up to its noble intentions of making the world more just. Its failure echoes that of the 1928 Kellogg-Briand Pact, which set out to banish wars and to settle disputes peacefully.
Omar al-Bashir waves on arrival in Sudan after attending an African Union summit in Johannesburg. Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Al-Bashir: South Africa’s moment of glory and shame

The attempt to arrest al-Bashir is the first time a court in an ICC member state has come to answering the question whether a sitting head of state can be detained and handed over to the ICC.
Sudan President Omar al-Bashir (L) ahead of the African Union summit in Johannesburg. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Why a great deal hangs on Al-Bashir’s fate in South Africa

As a signatory to the Rome Statute, South Africa is obliged to arrest Omar al-Bashir and end his status as a fugitive from international law for war crimes allegedly committed in the conflict in Darfur.

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