Articles on Women's pay

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Judge May Lahey (left) with actor Jean Harlow in 1932. The Cornell Daily Sun (digitally coloured image)

Meet the woman who can lay claim to being Australia’s first female judge

Dame Roma Mitchell is remembered as Australia's first female judge. But Queenslander May Lahey beat her to the punch when she became a judge in Los Angeles in 1928. Her lack of recognition is symptomatic of how Australia remembers expats, particularly women.
Women’s activism has indeed enabled progress to be made in norms and direct gender regulation, but it has not prevented, the growth of market liberalism that has increased regulation distance in many areas. Richard Milnes/ newzulu

Here’s an important reason the gender pay gap isn’t closing

The weakening of collective rights and employment protections has harmed the relative position of women in ways that have offset gains through changing values and individual rights.
In an ideal world of gender equality and recognition for women’s work, surrogacy could perhaps be part of a paid, legitimate economy. (Camila Cordeiro on Unsplash)

When women are surrogate mothers: Is that work?

As the Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society urges the government to consider "compensation" for surrogacy, we need to talk about the implications of this rhetoric for women.
A South African woman needs to work two months more than a man to earn the equivalent salary in a year. Shutterstock

Women are still paid less than men in South African companies

The South African gender pay gap is estimated, on average, to be between 15% and 17%. Employers are benefiting unduly from the historic undervaluing of women’s skills and contributions.

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