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Whose views skew the news? Media chiefs ready to vote out Labor, while reporters lean left

Most Australian journalists describe themselves as left-wing, yet amongst those who wield the real power in the country’s newsrooms, the Coalition holds a winning lead. But while the media’s political…

While reporters' political biases are always hotly debated, other biases remain - including too few voices from diverse backgrounds. AAP/Alan Porritt

Most Australian journalists describe themselves as left-wing, yet amongst those who wield the real power in the country’s newsrooms, the Coalition holds a winning lead.

But while the media’s political leanings will no doubt be debated in the lead-up to September’s federal election, our study has also found other largely unscrutinised biases remain - particularly whose views disproportionately shape the news.

Conducted between May 2012 and March this year, the University of the Sunshine Coast’s representative survey of 605 journalists around Australia found that more than half (51.0%) describe themselves as holding left-of-centre political views, compared with only 12.9% who consider themselves right-of-centre.

It is the first study of its kind in more than 20 years to involve such a large number of journalists, and follows on from the work of John Henningham in the early 1990s.

Our survey was conducted by telephone with carefully selected journalists from newspapers, magazines, radio and television stations, online news sites and news agency AAP, as a sample of the 8000 to 10,000 journalists in Australia today.

When asked about their voting intentions, less than two-thirds of the journalists we surveyed revealed their voting intention. Of those 372 people, 43.0% said they would give their first preference vote to Labor; 30.2% would vote for the Coalition; and 19.4% said they would choose the Greens - about twice the Australian average.

Media bosses more in sync with voters

Yet, among those who arguably matter most – the journalists in senior editorial ranks who have the most power to decide news agendas – a dramatically different picture emerged.

Among the 83 senior editors who took part in the survey, the Coalition was the party of choice on 43.2%, followed by Labor (34.1%) and the Greens (11.4%).

This suggests that Australia’s media bosses are more in line with the broader electorate, at least according to recent Newspoll results.

It is important to note that there is little research showing that journalists' personal political biases affect their work.

When asked in this survey about a range of influences on their work, many journalists said their superiors have a much stronger influence than their personal values and beliefs.

Aunty leans to the Greens

An interesting finding emerged when we compare journalists from the three biggest news organisations in the country – News Limited, Fairfax Media and the ABC.

The national broadcaster has repeatedly been attacked for having a seemingly leftist bias, while others have accused News Limited - and particularly its flagship newspaper The Australian - of being overly conservative in its political views.

At first glance, the findings do not support this assumption, with no significant differences in the way journalists from the ABC and News rate their political views on a scale of 0 (left) to 10 (right).

However, 41.2% of the 34 ABC journalists who declared a voting intention said they would vote for the Greens, followed by 32.4% for Labor and 14.7% for the Coalition.

In contrast, 46.5% of 86 News Limited journalists who answered this question said they would vote for Labor, 26.7% for the Coalition, and only 19.8% for the Greens. As well as The Australian, the News stable includes some of the country’s best-selling tabloids such as the Herald Sun, Daily Telegraph, Courier-Mail, Northern Territory News and the Adelaide Advertiser, and some suburban newspapers.

Among the 86 Fairfax Media journalists who responded, Labor was by far the most popular party at 54.7% support, followed by the Coalition and the Greens, both on 19.8%. The Fairfax journalists came from outlets including the Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, The Canberra Times, a range of regional and suburban newspapers, and metropolitan radio stations.

If we disregard the 42.8% of journalists who are undecided, refused to answer or would vote for a party or candidate other than the major three, this is a statistically significant result.

It means that even though only a smaller number of journalists answered the voting intentions, which does increase the margin of error, it is still reasonable to conclude that there is a marked difference between the voting intentions of journalists at the three major media organisations.

Australian stories that go untold

Where in the country journalists work also seems to make a major difference. Journalists at metropolitan news media are significantly more left-wing in their political views. Labor would receive 52.6% of the metropolitan journalist vote, while in regional areas, 44.4% would vote for the Coalition.

Our study also found that while journalists recognise their own political biases, they may be less aware of their cultural bias.

An overwhelming majority of journalists in this country still come from a white, Anglo-Saxon background, with minorities very few and far between in mainstream journalism.

Three out of four journalists give their ethnicity as at least partly Anglo-Saxon. Only 4.7% said they have an Asian or Middle Eastern background, which is around half of what it should be to reflect the make-up of the Australian population.

Journalists identifying as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders representing just 1.8% of Australian journalists - again, disproportionately lower than the 2.5% of Australians with an Indigenous background.

This is further evidence to support the argument that Australian journalists’ worldviews and cultural backgrounds are still not representative of the general population.

And it is an aspect that many argue is reflected in Australian media reporting of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues, as well as in stories related to race and ethnicity.


Note: This research has been accepted for publication in the June edition of the Australian Journalism Review. The margin of error for the entire study sample is 4%. Sub-samples of journalists' responses to some questions - such as voting intentions - are likely to have a higher margin error, however, appropriate statistical methods were used in testing for differences between sub-samples to take account of the smaller sample sizes. The survey response rate was 89.5%.

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215 Comments sorted by

  1. Greg North

    Retired Engineer

    It really comes as no surprise Folker, despite repeated bleating on here by a few conversationalists on the hijacking of quality coverage via MSM/ABC as they usually put it.

    I am however surprised with a couple of your comments.

    " It is important to note that there is little research showing that journalists' personal political biases affect their work. "
    So are you saying there has just been little research fullstop?
    And that is not surprising either for it would be kind of professional…

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    1. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to Hardy Gosch

      Ah Hardy, the old IA eh! , just like an alternate route to pregnancy.

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    2. Rex Gibbs

      Engineer/Director

      In reply to Hardy Gosch

      We Listen to what we like to hear and seek those with like minds.

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    3. Pat Moore

      gardener

      In reply to Greg North

      Greg.. problem with lexdyscia?

      That's AI for artificial insemination and now that you mention it the description is quite fitting for the process of MSM indoctrination of the popular mind. IA, Independent Australia is a valuable independent unbiased news and political investigation source and forum as the link to the story on Abbott's budget reply speech demonstrates.

      And the skewing to the right in the MSM is obviously because of the trickle down editorial effect/expectations issuing from…

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    4. Folker Hanusch

      Senior Research Fellow at Queensland University of Technology

      In reply to Greg North

      Thanks for your comments Greg. Just by way of clarification, a couple of points:
      It is very difficult to show any link between a journalists' political views and the stories they write. There has been a little bit of research, and it generally suggests that there is little if no link between the two. The thing is that most journalists do not go into the profession with a political intention, so they are then also not necessarily likely to display their conviction in their stories. Opinion/comment…

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    5. John Doyle

      architect

      In reply to Hardy Gosch

      Alan Austin also had an article 17th May in Newmatilda.com, a quiz
      "Chin Up, Swanny. It's Not All Bad"
      His dismembering of Abbott's lies is a good one.
      Unfortunately with Labor unable to not shoot itself in the foot every week, there really isn't any need for TA to lie, but he wants to keep up the pressure on Labor so that they can't avoid aiming at their feet. It doesn't bode well for the political future when the only real experience most of the Opposition has is in negatives.
      Lately we have become a nation of whingers, outdoing the usual suspects [the poms] yet we have little to complain about compared to what we see in most other countries. Just shows we are an ungrateful lot. We are but probably- like everyone - just knowledgeable enough to be misinformed. In my experience the press has either got it wrong or slanted. That's hardly about to change.

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    6. Andrew Inwood

      Statistician

      In reply to Hardy Gosch

      Read the article Hardy. While I'm no Abbott fan, you do yourself a disservice by quoting this article as fact.

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    7. Robert Tony Brklje
      Robert Tony Brklje is a Friend of The Conversation.

      retired

      In reply to Henry Verberne

      The internet now holds the balance of power, skew the news to favour the right and the majority stop buying it and bankruptcy looms.
      The left right political spectrum has never been clearer and simpler, left - sharing and caring (the adult), right - selfishness and greed (the teenager).
      The can dress it up all they like but it has never ever been more clearly delineated and if you doubt the maturity difference just observe the poseur behaviour of the right, the need to show off.

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    8. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to Pat Moore

      Well said. Thanks.

      The TC motto states:
      The enemy of trusted journalism is disinformation and spin.
      Agree.
      They endeavour to support evidence-based analysis, research and news.
      Great.
      Question: What is Michelle Grattan for example doing here?

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    9. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to Greg North

      "A pertinent TC posters integrity test, don't you think?"

      Sorry, to inform you Greg. You FAILED! Try again?
      On second thought, please don't!

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    10. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to Rex Gibbs

      Fundamentally true. But isn't it great to keep an open mind?

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    11. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to Andrew Inwood

      I prefer never to quote any article as providing "absolute" facts.

      As John Doyle said previously and I qoute:
      "In my experience the press has either got it wrong or slanted".

      My advice, keep on searching widely, form your own opinion and never stop re-assessing and re-evaluating your views.

      Warning, cliche coming up:
      "If something looks like a turd and smells like a turd it most likely is one".
      In my mind the no-position, no-policy Noalition fits the bill.

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    12. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to Greg North

      Greg,
      Many people entrenched in their ways find it difficult to wrap their minds around change. I understand that. In order not to be left behind one has to accept new ideas, learn and move forward. It needs an open mind. And yes, tt takes effort and determination to embrace these changes all around us.

      For example in the field of technology you previously displayed a sense of, shall we say, disconnectedness.

      It may help to read this article on AFHP.

      http://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/qa-on-topsy-turvy-nbn-debate/#more-4088

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    13. Steve Bloomberg

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to Greg North

      Given the documented cultural marxist slant of the media, documented in Quadrant by Frank Salter, this comes as no surprise. In terms of stories that go untold it is also telling to observe the bias in favour of open borders policies which go against the views of the majority of people, in Australia and nearly every developed and developing country surveyed by Pew Research.

      Further, as Salter observes:

      "It seems that the elite Australian media do not always report events as objective observers…

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    14. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Steve Bloomberg

      All too sadly true Steve.

      I was thumbing through one of my dog-eared copies of Cold War Warrior Gazette just the other week where I found page after page illustrating the direct links between Andrew Blot, Alan Jones and their North Korean marxist paymasters. I have seen the compromising photos of Michelle Grattan in Pyongyang.

      None the least in this bolshevik betrayal is the besmirchment of our very Englishness - the conflation of our wonderful "whiteness" with lesser mongrel types like the…

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  2. Ken Swanson

    Geologist

    "However, 41.2% of the 34 ABC journalists who declared a voting intention said they would vote for the Greens, followed by 32.4% for Labor and 14.7% for the Coalition."

    Last election ALP/ Greens Coalition 50.1; LNP 49.9

    If the ABC cannot get closer to the starting point bias of all taxpayers, it should be sold or discarded. The cronic bias of the ABC opens up the market for organizations like FOX News to balance it out. Then the looney left complain about that.

    Better that the taxpayers channel just represent all taxpayers views in an impartial way in the first place. Its internal investigations of bias are a joke. It is like the catholic church investigating itself; or Fair Work Australia investigating unions

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    1. Steve Birdsall

      Retired

      In reply to Ken Swanson

      Stop digging Ken.

      Your comments are ludicrous. Anyone who compares the ABC to Fox News simply can't be taken seriously.

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    2. Deirdre Whitford

      Un-Worker

      In reply to Ken Swanson

      Just for the sake of weighing in, Ken:

      It may, or may not, be outrageous that taxpayers are funding the ABC.

      But I will just mention that taxpayers are also directly funding News Limited' via the tax concessions attracted because The Australian runs at a substantial loss.

      On the other hand, I do share your concern that if billionaires were deprived of their personal megaphones that would, indeed, amount to a serious infringement of their free speech rights as Australian citizens.

      Especially if, in fact, they were Australian citizens.

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    3. David Somerfield

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to Ken Swanson

      Last year when I was in Chiang Mai - Thailand a group of American tourists asked for the TV to be turned off at the breakfast serving area as it was on the FOX-News channel. In conversation it transpired that a huge number of Americans are sickened by the right-wing bias and blatant falsehoods espoused by FOX-News.
      I was skeptical about this due to the reported opinion polls at the time putting Obama in a losing position.
      The subsequent election proved that Americans do indeed have the ability to pick out the "BS" when it came to casting their ballots.
      One can only hope that Australians are the same.
      I for one hope the polls this time prove inaccurate as the current polling ignores those who only use mobile phones.
      I do admit though that this is faint hope LOL

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    4. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to David Somerfield

      Will people be voting for what they want? If so it is democracy. But if they are uninformed one can argue that the media has killed our democracy.

      The biggest and most successful bias of the media is not against Labor but in having most people think that Labor is the party of the left (and the Greens are extremists). As a result I expect that most of the people who support Greens policies will vote Labor (and some even Liberal).

      Looking at the following it is clear that Labor are a party of…

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    5. Jon Hurn

      IT Project Manager

      In reply to Ken Swanson

      Ken states "If the ABC cannot get closer to the starting point bias of all taxpayers, it should be sold or discarded."

      Huh? The ABC should report the facts and hold all pollies to account. It should never create a reporting bias under any circumstances.

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    6. John Crest

      logged in via email @live.com.au

      In reply to Jon Hurn

      In that case, it should be shut down. Even the most rudimentary analysis will show the ABC to be very left wing.

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    7. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to John Crest

      John Crest - Please provide such a rudimentary analysis.

      I've posted that on the ABC 7pm TV News so far this month that the federal Greens have had only two mentions, and the state Greens only one. How many times have we heard from business leaders and those from the right on the ABC TV News this month?

      And with ABC opinion have often do we hear from the IPA? And how does this compare with hearing from The Greens or someone who is supporting them?

      So how is the ABC very left wing?

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    8. Henry Verberne

      Once in the fossil fuel industry but now free to speak up

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      It is left wing because John Crest detests the fact that the ABC has a range of commentators who espouse views that do not accord with John Crest's view of the world. That is why he wants to see it sold off.

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    9. Felix MacNeill

      Environmental Manager

      In reply to John Crest

      John, shouldn't that read 'ONLY the most rudimentary analysis will show the ABC to be very left wing.'?

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    10. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to John Phillip

      The editorial in The Australian of Sept 9, 2010 said:

      "Greens leader Bob Brown has accused The Australian of trying to wreck the alliance between the Greens and Labor. We wear Senator Brown’s criticism with pride. We believe he and his Green colleagues are hypocrites; that they are bad for the nation; and that they should be destroyed at the ballot box. The Greens voted against Mr Rudd’s emissions trading scheme because they wanted a tougher regime, then used the lack of action on climate change to damage Labor at the election. Their flakey economics should have no place in the national debate."

      So the Australian has been upfront about wanting the Greens "destroyed at the ballot box".

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    11. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Michael,

      Editorials ... god do people still read editorials? I'm not allowed under medical direction.

      These can be as biassed and opinionated as the proprietors want them. Couldn't care less myself. The editorial is where such opinion is appropriate.

      Where I think the process is more insidious is in the slanting of news - what is reported and how. Opinion masquerading as fact.

      Take the Telegraph's issue announcing the NDIS passing parliament. "Another broken promise!" Nothing about…

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    12. Norman Bradbury

      Renewalist

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Excuse me, MWH, I've commented elsewhere on this thread, but your reference to The Australian - The editorial in The Australian of Sept 9, 2010 - does illustrate very well a politically-driven instrument for excision of the Greens.

      Given the date of this item could one say the same conviction and intent by that editorial holds today?

      Further, might it be that institutionally instrumental opposition in general to the Labor-led government is more about removing its ally than the Labor Party?

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    13. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      Peter - I agree that the editorial is an opinion piece.

      The reason I quoted this is that the editor of the Australian had said that an aim of the paper was to get rid of The Greens, and a quick internet search found that editorial quote.

      As you say, the real damage is the bias in the news articles which are meant to be factual. Media Watch has done a good job in showing the bias of the Australian on climate change.

      My view is that The Age is more biased than The Australian because the Australian has an upfront right-wing bias. The Age has many articles and opinion pieces with a progressive agenda, but most of the time these articles don't mention The Greens. The Age's bias is to have its readers think "If only Labor would do better" and never think of the Greens.

      For one classic example, see http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/politics/escape-to-a-fair-deal-not-in-this-country-20130424-2iezl.html

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    14. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Norman Bradbury

      Norman - I don't read The Australian so can't comment on how things have changed since 2010.

      But overall, most notably the ABC TV I watch, I've noticed that the Greens have become much less visible. So perhaps the Australian is now following a similar line - rather than putting the Greens down they just don't mention them nearly as much.

      And if you have to mention the Greens, do it only in the final paragraph - how is this for an incredible example of avoiding mentioning the Greens until you have to http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/political-news/detention-centres-closed-to-inspection-20130516-2jpeo.html

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    15. Norman Bradbury

      Renewalist

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Michael,

      It would appear orchestrated obliteration or some such managed MO. Much used, practised elsewhere, as modern politics has revealed.

      Not my field, I"m afraid, insofar The Age item. Tho that final par reads reasonably well for the Greens trying be constructive. Putting on a humor hat I might say the journo suggested Greens light encountered a 'heated' right.

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    16. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to John Phillip

      As I've already added, the real bias is in the so-called neutral new reporting. The editorial merely made the philosophy of the paper clear.

      But, John Phillip, are you seriously saying that The Australian does not have a bias towards the right?

      I'm sure that many who read The Australian recognise the right-wing bias, but as this fits their world view, like the paper for this. But most of these people would have no trouble admitting that the paper has this bias.

      To claim that The Australian is neutral seems a rather extremist view.

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    17. John Crest

      logged in via email @live.com.au

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      But, MWH, are you seriously saying that the ABC does not have a bias towards the left?

      I'm sure that many who watch the ABC recognise the left-wing bias, but as this fits their world view, like the ABC for this. But most of these people would have no trouble admitting that the ABC has this bias.

      To claim that the ABC is neutral seems a rather extremist view.

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    18. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to John Crest

      The whole profession of journalism has a bias towards the left John and yes this is found in the ABC where there is less scope for editorial direction acting at the behest of their commercial masters. There is also a "bias" based on education levels - should we insist on a percentage of the ignorant and uneducated in the ABC's newsrooms to strive for "balance"? Some sort of affirmative action regime for taxi drivers?

      Personally I'd be more concerned by factual reportage - critical and unchecked…

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    19. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      I would put it this way.

      If people know what they are voting for that is democracy.
      If they are uninformed or misinformed democracy is in peril.

      What I vehemently disagree with is the blinkered old-fashioned, out of date analogy of left, right and centre.

      The focus must be on policies and outcomes.

      To even suggest there is no difference between the previous regressive regime and this progressive government, ably assisted and supported by Greens and Independents is simply ludicrous.
      Conveniently forgetting the exceptional handling of the GFC and not crediting them with the implementation of vital structural reforms does not help your arguments.

      The question to ask the electorate:

      Have Murdoch, his Mates and Minions made up YOUR mind how to vote?

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    20. John Doyle

      architect

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      My view, if anyone is interested, is that the Labour party is the left side of the right arm in politics. How else can one accept their funding of wealthy private schools?
      However what really stands out in my mind is that the Labor party is the party of imagination. The LNP is a party of consolidation which in the spectrum of Australian society is quite a successful balance.
      This is a broad brush analysis, but that seems to me the difference between the parties.
      By USA standards both of our parties are Democrats, so the loony right so evident and dysfunctional there hasn't yet much of a foothold here. Let's hope we can keep it at bay.
      Rupert Murdoch's support through Fox News seems to me to have a secondary [to making money] aim to trash America. Give 'em the tools and they'll do it themselves!

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    21. wilma western

      logged in via email @bigpond.com

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      I agree- lots of news-slanting through selection ,headlines etc...don't you love the way words such as "admitted" and "claimed" are used instead of "said " or "satade" etc? And the headline slogans get parroted on TV - even on the ABC. Everyone on the bandwagon? There are some exceptions...

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    22. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to John Phillip

      "The Australian is unashamedly right wing"

      A probably well informed opinion, said by Bruce Guthrie, editor-in-chief, the Herald Sun, 2007-08, speaking on Murdoch, SBS Doco earlier this month

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  3. Caroline Rae

    Helper

    What about the proportion of women journalists vs the population percentage? And have you information about the gender voting intentions/skew?

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    1. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to John Phillip

      Thank you John.
      I take this as a compliment, coming from you!
      Much appreciated. Have a good one!

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    1. James Jenkin

      EFL Teacher Trainer

      In reply to John Newton

      Maybe then why stop at media? Perhaps we could do something about the electoral system as well. Give people with more 'intelligence' more of a say - perhaps two votes to one?

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    2. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to John Newton

      No doubt about it John, especially if a Journo says it is so eh!

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    3. Michael Gormly

      Editor at Superkern Design Pty Ltd

      In reply to John Newton

      Thanks for that Mills gem, John - I've pinched it for an email signature. I'm always bemused when "inner city latte sippers" - and the Greens - are mocked by the right when they are statistically better educated (and often earn higher incomes) than most cohorts in society. What would THEY know then?

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    4. John Newton

      Author Journalist

      In reply to James Jenkin

      James I presume you're joking but it has always seemed to me different levels for franchise might not be a bad idea - instead of universal suffrage, we could have educated franchise - you sit for a test, and depending on your score your vote is weighted.

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    5. James Jenkin

      EFL Teacher Trainer

      In reply to Michael Gormly

      Michael, I'm not sure 'better educated' correlates with 'wiser' or 'more able to run the country'.

      I studied for years, but you sure wouldn't want me shaping government policy or running a budget.

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    6. James Jenkin

      EFL Teacher Trainer

      In reply to John Newton

      I love the fact you stand up for somewhat controversial ideas!

      What would be valid assessment to determine someone would be better at choosing a government?

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    7. Michael Gormly

      Editor at Superkern Design Pty Ltd

      In reply to James Jenkin

      Ha ha, James. Your modesty belies your message! Yet you do make a point and the idea of a selective franchise is dangerous territory. Better to keep universal suffrage and find a way to keep the general public well informed. I simply make the point that better educated people have a head start in forming opinions.

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    8. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Michael Gormly

      "I simply make the point that better educated people have a head start in forming opinions."

      Now I was talking to a lovely old lady at the Woolibuddha shops last week. She'd left school when she was 12 and is functionally iliterate. But had spent the rest of her life doing nothing but forming opinions... groundless, fact-free, bigoted and fear filled opinions. About everything and anything, anyone and everywhere.

      Sadly opinions don't require edjerkashun - in fact I'd go as far as to suggest that they are inversely related.

      The more educated one is, the less likely one is to hold onto opinions like a limpet to a rock... we tend to realise how new facts and new ideas and better understandings sees our opinions change.

      That's a hallmark of being educated I think... the capacity to learn and change one's mind. But that's just my opinion.

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    9. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to Michael Shand

      " I dont know what implications you want to draw from that but it should not be dismissed out of hand as "Elitist", it is what it is "
      Yep, some people are just too ready to generalise Michael.

      We can even generalise by saying it'll not matter on education or profession as you'll find people with differing views in all walks of life, it likely being their level of interest and knowledge of a topic that together with experiences might form their views.

      " Just like how conservatives deny climate…

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    10. Michael Shand

      Software Tester

      In reply to Greg North

      Again you need to understand what Trend Analysis is and how it is useful - to dismiss these facts as just "Generalisations" shows you dont understand what you are talking about

      Yes they are generalisations about people based on trends - that doesnt mean they are not true

      The best example I think is that women that are lower on the socio economic scale are more likely to have more babies than those that are affluent or well off in society - this is true, this is undeniably true, yes it is a generalisation based on a trend but that doesnt mean it's not true nor does it mean it is not valuable

      Deny all you want, facts are facts

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    11. Michael Shand

      Software Tester

      In reply to Greg North

      "conservatives federal parliamentary leader is one whose mind is not so rigid and has stated it is something his party should discuss. " - ohh so they are doing what the lefties did a year ago - how progressive

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    12. David Thompson

      Marketing Research

      In reply to James Jenkin

      Or why not compensate conservative people for being 'stupid'? Perhaps our 're-distributionist' cheer squad will support a 'Stupidity Bonus' of $50,000 per 'conservative' vote they make? Or a 10% tax cut?

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    13. David Thompson

      Marketing Research

      In reply to Michael Shand

      "more liberal or liberal leaning"? Well which is it? You can't have both.

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    14. Michael Shand

      Software Tester

      In reply to David Thompson

      Seriously? I do not believe that you are this dense that you would accidently confuse the liberal party with liberalism

      lib·er·al
      Adjective - Open to new behavior or opinions and willing to discard traditional values.

      Noun - A person of liberal views

      con·serv·a·tive
      Adjective - Holding to traditional attitudes and values and cautious about change or innovation, typically in politics or religion.

      Noun - A person who is averse to change and holds to traditional values and attitudes, typically in politics

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    15. John Newton

      Author Journalist

      In reply to Michael Gormly

      Michael (and James) how about this for a controversial idea/conspiracy theory: perhaps it isn't in the interest of governments - who control education - to have the public well-educated - a dumb populace is easier to rule? I was going to wonder why we don't teach our children 'civics' but then realised that the Americans do, and that is not such a great example

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    16. John Newton

      Author Journalist

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      michael - another aphorism: opinions are like arse-holes - everyone has one. Or in the case of opinions, more than one

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  4. Steven Rudolphy

    GP & Part Time Senior Lecturer in General Practice (Cairns Campus) at James Cook University

    I really like the headline. Can we invent a word today - it's very Seussian.

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    1. Liz Minchin

      Queensland Editor at The Conversation

      In reply to Steven Rudolphy

      Seussian? What a thing to say! Thank you Steven, you made my day.

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    1. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to Hardy Gosch

      A lot of people think IA is what farmers talk about Hardy when a Bull ain't hard or it's too hard to get one but either way they know bull just like a lot of people.

      What on earth would you find of value on that site.

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    2. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Hardy Gosch

      Thanks for the link to the Independent Australia article.

      I'll have to check out more of their website.

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    3. Michael Gormly

      Editor at Superkern Design Pty Ltd

      In reply to Greg North

      I agree, Greg, that IA's obvious bias can be a little offputting. Nevertheless, the linked article is well informed and supported - if IA is so worthless, perhaps you would like to rebut the article instead of just criticising the site?

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    4. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to Michael Gormly

      I had a quick look Michael, half knowing what to expect seeing as you have the IA regulars continually linking to IA.
      As expected, that particular article is just another lets can Tony Abbot rant, IA having a huge leftist lean.
      To be more specific about the article itself which headlines looking at the lies, any rational person would see it more as a labor party wish to rubbish what Tony Abbott has said by putting their own views with their own twist.

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    5. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Greg North

      Worth noting that Greg North provides no evidence that the IA article is wrong.

      I wonder where the rational people of the right are? Why is it that we almost never find a post here from the right that provides some compelling evidence. Instead we just get climate change denial, and now, with Greg, the economic reality is also ignored.

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    6. Michael Gormly

      Editor at Superkern Design Pty Ltd

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Indeed, Greg. You simply continue to make unsupported assertions of bias. That's not rebuttal, it's ideology.

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    7. Henry Verberne

      Once in the fossil fuel industry but now free to speak up

      In reply to Greg North

      Greg, you have made an assertion about IA but offer no argument to back it up. I read IA from time to time and the quality of its articles vary a bit and it is unashamedly left of centre but it has run some quite detailed and interesting analyses of the Peter Slipper affair and James Ashby for starters.

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    8. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to John Phillip

      Hi Grumpy.
      If you could just briefly control your Daily Terror, the HUN and the OZ inspired outbursts and tantrums, you will find that IA, NM, AFHP and other more enlightend online publications have covered these subjects very extensively.
      Live and learn?

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    9. Hardy Gosch

      Mr.

      In reply to Greg North

      The "value" predominantly is to question one's often ingrained false perceptions. Alternative viewpoints. Challenge your grey cells if you will. Not more of the same old, same old! Nes pas?
      Time to move on, mate?

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    10. John Phillip
      John Phillip is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Grumpy Old Man

      In reply to Hardy Gosch

      Good stuff, Hardy. I wonder why mention was only made of the left leaning issues. You would have to admit theat there is a left bias on this page, no? (Hardy, please excuse the descent into the left/right paradigm - it just simplifies this particular discussion.)

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  5. John Crest

    logged in via email @live.com.au

    It'd be interesting to do some research on the political views of the authors on here too.

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    1. Don McArthur

      Retired educator at McArthur Park Apiary

      In reply to John Crest

      That would be somewhat revealing John. I have observed a characteristic of Labor party politicians and their followers, who tend to use the future tense in their criticisms, as in " - jeopardise our future by handing over power to Murdoch, his Mates and Minions". . . These sorts of claims appear to be as clueless as soap adds that promise a better life if you purchase such and such soap powder.
      Someone could do research on the political leanings of compulsive fortune tellers.

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    2. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Leonard Stall

      Leonard, so does Communism.

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    3. Felix MacNeill

      Environmental Manager

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Does that translate as 'Communism has a liberal bias'? If so, Geoffrey, you've finally managed to outdo even yourself in the non sequitur game!

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  6. Peter Boyd Lane

    geologist

    "I read it in the newspaper" tests the credibility of any claim, and the voting intentions of the people who write for newspapers should also be taken with a grain of salt.

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    1. Doug Hutcheson

      Poet

      In reply to Peter Boyd Lane

      True. The bias of what is written is the important thing, not the bias of the people who do the writing. It is the published articles that help mould public opinion, not the political alignment of the journalists involved.

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    1. Michael Gormly

      Editor at Superkern Design Pty Ltd

      In reply to Edward Henner

      A good point, Henner. A functional democracy depends on people being well informed. Plainly this is not the case in Australia, and this is the fallacy behind the Coalition's claim they will have a mandate to do things like abolish the carbon tax. It will be a false mandate.

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    2. Chris Saunders

      retired

      In reply to Cathryn McCormack

      I would go even further than that Cathy to say there appears to be an interesting correlation between media bosses' opinion and news poll results.

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    3. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to Michael Gormly

      " and this is the fallacy behind the Coalition's claim they will have a mandate to do things like abolish the carbon tax. It will be a false mandate. "

      There you go Michael with biased garbage

      Why not be more truthful with your thoughts and say that the coalition have put forward as policy abolition of the Carbon Tax and given how that was brought in by Gillard, if it is used as a key policy by the coalition in the eklection and they have a resounding win, why would it not be a mandate?

      Why a false mandate?

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    4. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to Cathryn McCormack

      You really think so Cathryn when we have at least three quite separate media forums, three commercial television stations and two others, ABC and SBS and employed in them all, thousands of people.

      Do you really think there is not ample coverage by different sources of the many events covered and do you really think that media bosses have a day to day involvement in what gets reported and how it gets reported?

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    5. Michael Shand

      Software Tester

      In reply to Greg North

      "Do you really think there is not ample coverage by different sources of the many events covered" - with the internet now almost every position is published - thats not the point thought is it

      "do you really think that media bosses have a day to day involvement in what gets reported and how it gets reported?" - The best example is that Murdoch reviews talking points on fox news, watches the shows with the sound off to make sure that it sends the right message and sends notes to pundits about what language to use and what stories to report and how to report them

      This is all well documented

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  7. Mick Mac Andrew

    Rev Father

    Telephone polling is risky because the science behind it is akin to 'snake oil' stuff. I completely disagree with the results as my experience of ABC journalists leads me to regard them as share-trading monarchists.

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  8. Rex Gibbs

    Engineer/Director

    It may be that the old saw is true: "If you don't vote Socialist/Labour before 30 you haven't got a heart, and if you don't vote Liberal conservative by the time you are 40 you haven't got a brain!". We all know that Fran Kelly soft on Labour Ministers in interviews and that Jane Albrechtsen is excoriating. Read them both and make your mind up like an adult

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    1. Felix MacNeill

      Environmental Manager

      In reply to Rex Gibbs

      Rex, it's worth getting the quote correct. It was from George Bernard Shaw and it amounted to 'if you're not a communist at 20 you're a fool; if you're still a communist at 30, you're an even bigger fool.'

      I think you'll find the word he used was 'communist' - it is, to put it mildly, cheating, to try to elide that with 'Socialist/Labour' on the one hand and 'Liberal conservative' on the other.

      These things are generally clearer if you avoid this kind of intellectual finger-paintong that tends to create little other than a grey-brown smudge.

      Of course, I'm deeply proud of having leapt both of Shaw's hurdles (and done it a bit younger than he suggested) whereas, I suspect, you fell at the first hurdle - but I'm happy to be corrected on this if I'm being unfair.

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    2. Chris Saunders

      retired

      In reply to Rex Gibbs

      There appears little need for a journalist to be soft or excoriating. They usually are not meant to be popular performers. The knack lies in asking the right questions and listening to the answers (apart from doing your prep of course) and then possibly the impossible; avoiding the editor's edit.

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  9. Ronald Ostrowski

    logged in via Facebook

    It is not about what a journalist's political leanings are. That does not count in the slightest. It is the content of the overall MSM/ABC and hate radio which has been decidedly fact-impaired and actively working towards regime change. Whatever, journalists really think is totally irrelevant. As for the media generated polling, they were proved wrong in the USA elections, and hopefully will prove wrong here. And, just how valid is the statement that editors are more aligned with the electorate…

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    1. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to Ronald Ostrowski

      " It really comes as no surprise Folker, despite repeated bleating on here by a few conversationalists on the hijacking of quality coverage via MSM/ABC as they usually put it. "
      Even before the footsteps on the pavement a few miles away Ronald!

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    2. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Ronald Ostrowski

      Ronald,
      IMO the best foil for racial hate as currently described is to completely get government out of the picture. In the days of my youth, the melting pot was much more harmonious when people could openly crack jokes about each other and about themselves. The absence of Jackboots defused the situation much more effectively then.

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    3. Ronald Ostrowski

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Geoffrey, my post addressed the democratic right to truth and how the fourth estate are failing us in that regards. I mentioned nothing about the media's right to engage in false racial vilification a la Andrew Bolt denying Aboriginals their claims to an indigenous background because of their part European heritage. That is a topic for another day.

      Although any media insults directed at individuals, who are prevented from responding with mutual jokes, is not only unfair but can lead to unjustified hatreds. That is the basic problem with the news outlets today. They bleat about the freedom to say anything and censor alternative opinions. This I have experienced first hand in many ABC/MSM forums. Now that is akin to the old USSR's Pradva and similar news outlets in East Block satelite countries.

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  10. Peter Hindrup

    consultant

    Those who get to do regular opinion pieces are obviously displaying their own bias. Editorial writers are being paid to reflect the views of management.
    Journalists reporting upon ‘news’ ought not be doing anything but presenting the facts before them. A view that the linking of their names to every report discourages.

    The simplest example of this is when in an armed conflict the journalist is embedded with the army. Obviously if you are embedded with ‘the good guys’, and reliant on them for…

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    1. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Peter Hindrup

      Precisely Peter.

      The telling part of this little survey is this:

      "When asked in this survey about a range of influences on their work, many journalists said their superiors have a much stronger influence than their personal values and beliefs."

      I would have liked to see a bit more discussion of how that influence operates.

      It goes to the heart of what we actually mean when we talk about "press freedom" and "freedom of speech" which seem to be both closely related to ownership of a masthead…

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    2. Greg North

      Retired Engineer

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      " The telling part of this little survey is this:

      "When asked in this survey about a range of influences on their work, many journalists said their superiors have a much stronger influence than their personal values and beliefs." "

      And you have not heard about self interest Peter and not so much as to please superiors but even the mention of it as much as disguising is an art in itself.

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    3. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Peter Hindrup

      Peter Hindrup,
      For comparative context, what would you care to comment about the Australian Union practise of "No ticket, no start."? Are you surprised that junior journos pay some attention to the directions of their superiors? Other Unionists appear to.

      Journalism is full of unexpected consequences. One can read of attempts to publish papers that give only good news. If you believe what is written, you find that they do not last very long. I think I read this in a newspaper, so caveat emptor.

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    4. Peter Hindrup

      consultant

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      General answer: No!.

      I forget that I am getting old. When I trained, with the second biggest circulation paper in NZ, ( the biggest was the NZ Woman's Weekly), the overriding instruction was: 'Remember that you are merely the eyes and the ears of those who cannot be there. If you ask a question, it ought to be a question that those people might ask'.

      A byline? Forget it. Most Journalists worked their entire lives without ever receiving such.

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  11. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

    Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

    How journalists vote should not effect how they write (and the article even mentions that the editors hold sway). If you want to see bias look at what is in the media.

    For example, the Age often bends over backwards to ignore the Greens - see http://http://map.boards.net/thread/4/age-melbourne for some blatant examples I've written about this month.

    In the first 19 days of May the 7pm ABC TV News in Melbourne has only mentioned the federal Greens twice (both with video) and the Victorian Greens…

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    1. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      What is reported has some relation to what is presented as press releases etc to lazy journos. I can see a tactical reason for the Greens to stay deadly quiet at the time mentioned my MegaWattHours. This is because they are so extreme that each time they make a press release they have a high possibility of causing fright among horses and small children.

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    2. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      MWH,
      Show me the quantitative, hard evidence that Climate Change is not 'crap'.
      I've studied it for years and conclude that the public face is rather like USA restaurants of the 1970s, where imposing facades were found to be made of cardboard and sticky tape. One good push and it will all fall over.
      I'm surprised you mention it at all, given that there has been no 'Global Warming' since 1997, as admitted by virtually everyone who studies it in depth. Next thing you'll be wondering why we are not still discussing the top news story from 1997 - Princess Diana. Would that be productive?

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    3. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Geoffrey - If you would like to learn something about climate change I suggest you read the articles on posted on this website.

      If, on the other hand, you believe that the academics are all part of some huge conspiracy .... what are you doing reading a website which supports evidence based information?

      PS - Isn't it amazing how we ALWAYS have a climate change denialists posting here whenever climate change is mentioned. I'm pretty sure that there is an organised lobby group ensuring that there is always someone on duty to post this rubbish.

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    4. Michael Gormly

      Editor at Superkern Design Pty Ltd

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Geoffrey, if you have 'studied' climate change for years you'll know that the 'No global warming since 1997' meme is a well refuted canard. For a start it ignores ocean warming which continues apace. Just Google the phrase - or related phrases such as 'Ian Plimer' - and add 'rebuttal' to your search. You'll soon see how deceptive the denialist movement is.

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  12. Michael Shand

    Software Tester

    Great Article, thanks for posting, some journalists even in the conversation recognise that their role gives them a position to influence public opinion and they then report certain stories and ommit other stories for this reason, Michelle Grattan being the Cheif Offender here

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  13. Ross Holding

    Agricultural Research Consultant

    Dont think there are any surprises in this article. Although, like comments from other contributors, Greens are LEFT wing so that certainly makes ABC more left leaning.

    I can recall Senator Robert Ray discussing journalists political leanings a number of years ago. His feelings were very similar to the findings of this survey. So again, no surprises.

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  14. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

    Boss

    The lead article here has many errors.
    For example "Our survey was conducted by telephone with carefully selected journalists from newspapers, magazines, radio and television stations, online news sites and news agency AAP, as a sample of the 8000 to 10,000 journalists in Australia today."
    It is an essential of polling of this type to select a RANDOM set. The method used here would probably introduce bias.
    Next "When asked about their voting intentions, less than two-thirds of the journalists…

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    1. Folker Hanusch

      Senior Research Fellow at Queensland University of Technology

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Geoffrey, thanks for your comments. Just to clarify a couple of things:
      The study used random sampling. My wording may have been a little clumsy, but essentially this is what we did: we mapped the Australian media sphere, wrote to all news organisations asking for staff lists, and supplemented that with other publicly available lists when we didn't get a response (response rate from news orgs was low, of course). We then conducted some stratifying to ensure that the general make-up of the sample…

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    2. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Folker Hanusch

      It's what's called in the trade a "taster" ... the biggest constraints being cost and time. To that extent "quick and dirty"... as I said elsewhere a bit "tabloidy" (appropriately).

      But there are also design issues when one is sampling from a small pool and seeking controversial questions that touch on professionalism, perceptions and self-interest. I'm actually surprised you got such a good strike rate from management myself.

      This sort of snapshot is not designed to establish Eternal…

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    3. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Folker Hanusch

      Folker,
      Merely writing to news outlets to get staff lists from which you selected a small sub-set - that is a classical way to start with bias. Bias by definition happens when respondents choose to participate or to defer.

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    4. Folker Hanusch

      Senior Research Fellow at Queensland University of Technology

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      Thanks very much Peter. That's right, the goal here was to get journalists' views on a broad range of issues - voting intentions was not the main priority actually, it was one of the interesting aspects that we found. And is an interesting aspect to follow up with broader range of questions as you suggest. Main interest was on professional views, views of influences on their work, views of changes in the industry - aspects that we asked multiple questions on so could do factor analysis looking for underlying themes.

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    5. Folker Hanusch

      Senior Research Fellow at Queensland University of Technology

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Hi Geoffrey,

      we got a very low response rate (not surprisingly) from news organisations in terms of actual staff lists. Those staff lists that we did get appeared I am quite sure were accurate. The vast majority was through other publicly availabe lists - eg. Courier-Mail and The Age have all their journos' names online. We also sampled from published material, ie. a range of bylines, etc. There are also other lists, such as Margaret Gee's Media Guide. Believe me, a lot of effort went int this. It may not be 100% perfect, but it is the best we can get when news organisations do not provide staff lists. As I pointed out, the sampling was entirely random, and as I state in the article, response rate was 89.5% - which is very good for a study like this. That means only 10% refused to participate - I would disagree that this results in a biased sample.

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  15. Massimo Bini

    Tertiary Education Consultant at Vision Australia

    Iit may be interesting to consider how freely accessible blogs and media providers like The Conversation impact on the "skewing of the news" in the near future.

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  16. Tony Grant

    Student

    Another poll?

    And not worth a stamp.

    Yes, I can see the balance in the rags/media in general, you have got to be kidding?

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  17. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

    Boss

    Michael Gormly,
    You write "Geoffrey, if you have 'studied' climate change for years you'll know that the 'No global warming since 1997' meme is a well refuted canard."
    I asked you for evidence, not for a repeat of some words you might have read in a newspaper.
    I know of no published refutation that is credible. Do you?

    This topic is a classic example of mass influence of journos by hugely well-funded pressure groups like the IPCC.

    In general, the journos do very little independent research. They just sit there hypnotised like chooks looking a snake in the eye.

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    1. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      If Geoffrey has such disdain for evidence based research that the IPCC are to him just a "hugely well-funded pressure group", then what is he doing at The Conversation?

      Since Obama won his first term partly by his side better using the internet, the right are making sure that their views are always well represented on all major on-line forums.

      My guess as to why Geoffrey Harold Sherrington is posting here is that he is paid to do so.

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    2. Michael Gormly

      Editor at Superkern Design Pty Ltd

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Geoffrey I believe I provided a rich source of evidence and a way out of the online denialist silos with my Google tip. Just add 'rebuttal' to a search of any of these denialist memes and whole new worlds will open up to you.

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    3. Michael Shand

      Software Tester

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      These clowns do this for free, you dont need to pay them they are just useful idiots ready to repeat whatever murdoch, koch and co want them to repeat

      They have been manipulated or are self deluded into thinking that the whole world is a conspiracy and the only ones that they can trust are people like Andrew Bolt, Alex Jones, etc

      One of my favourite Alex Jones lines was "What I'm about to tell you is top secret and no one else has the balls to report this, You wont see this in any other media" - obviously its not because its top secret that you wont hear anyone else report it - its because its made up

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    4. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Michael Shand

      Michael Shand.

      I think that there are right-wing party political posters who are organised but do if for free. You can tell that someone has volunteered and they get assigned a forum or a post on a forum. These people do lots of Tea Party style very political posts.

      I feel certain that there is also a funded campaign by vested interests. These posters don't focus on party politics but on policy. Their posts are actually very sophisticated and isn't the sort of thing that could consistently…

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    5. Michael Shand

      Software Tester

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Although I dont like to speculate or buy into unfounded theory's, It does seem plausible

      Just for fun, I'll try to get on the mailing list of one of these groups under a fake name and see if this is actually happening.

      Will send you a message if anything turns up

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    6. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Michael Shand

      It would probably be fairly easy to find someone organising keen conservatives to post political views into forums.

      What we probably won't know about for sure for many a year is whether or not there is an organisation, like the IPA, paying people to post the pro-vested interests posts. I suspect that one day someone in the know will say "Of course we were doing it. We would have been mad not to."

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    7. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Mark Duffett

      Mark Duffett - a typical right-wing response because you are ignoring logic and the evidence.

      We know that the vested interests are funding their interests to be presented to the public - exhibit A, the IPA.

      Of course I'm not suggesting that all those I disagree with are paid. But when you analyse the posts on The Conversation with who, when, how often, and the contents of the posts, I believe that there is strong evidence that especially the climate change denial posts are organised - and this is most likely paid work.

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    8. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to John Phillip

      I have posted about this many times in the past on The Conversation with information about number of posts and timing, etc.

      But people can see the evidence for themselves if they start looking out for it.

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    9. Steve Hindle

      logged in via email @bigpond.com

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Actually Michael the problem is far worse than you realise.
      Not only has there been a right wing conspiracy to infiltrate the Conversation from the right, but the fairies at the bottom of the garden have infiltrated the Greens. They cast spells you see. (Just look at what they have done to Christine Milne)

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    10. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Michael Gormly

      Michael Gormly,
      Since the thread is about newspapers and bias, what do you care to comment about this recent article?
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-22567023

      It starts "Scientists say the recent downturn in the rate of global warming will lead to lower temperature rises in the short-term. Since 1998, there has been an unexplained "standstill" in the heating of the Earth's atmosphere. Writing in Nature Geoscience, the researchers say this will reduce predicted warming in the coming decades........ "

      When are you going to catch up with the reality of present events? If you call this a "canard", then you might need to define your terms because "canard" seems refuted by data by essentially all who matter.

      Is it you who is promoting this canard spin, or did you read it in a biased newspaper? What is your motive?

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    11. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      The article also says "But long-term, the expected temperature rises will not alter significantly."

      So the article makes clear that climate change is still a major threat.

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    12. Michael Gormly

      Editor at Superkern Design Pty Ltd

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Yes, Geoffrey, the 'biased' ABC did mention that the findings had little bearing on long-term warming. You know very well that 1998 was arguable the hottest year on record and there have been several years since then hotter than anything before then, so any levelling is 'cold comfort'. Last year was the 9th or 10th hottest on record depending on whose figures you accept. It all depends how short a graph you want to draw. Oh, and the solar minimum in 2009 might have had something to do with levelling the warming for a while.

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    13. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      MWH,
      You are wrong.
      You cannot compare a measured past record with a future model guess.
      That is a class 1 failure.
      The performance of guesses about future changes is covered in a recent note at
      http://joannenova.com.au/2013/05/major-30-reduction-in-modelers-estimates-of-climate-sensitivity-skeptics-were-right/
      There are like discussions at many, many other places.
      Overcome your possible desire not to read what you do not like to learn, and learn.

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    14. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      One of the reason I think that the climate change deniers are organised is that it is usual to have one denier on one thread, one on another thread, and neither commenting in both. Just like they have been 'assigned' a thread.

      If Geoffrey Harold Sherrington had any real interest in climate change and in following what was said on this at The Conversation, he would have read and contributed to:
      https://theconversation.com/long-term-warming-short-term-variability-why-climate-change-is-still-an-issue-14476

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    15. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      MWH,
      You are absolutely wrong again.
      You should refrain from inventing stories.
      At the relevant time I was helping my wife who was fighting to stay alive.
      I bitterly resent your ignorant implication that this showed a lack of honesty or sincerity in my contributions to TC.

      Free advice. If you don't have the hard data, shut up.

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    16. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      And MWH, where have I stated that I am a climate change denier?
      I merely create, calculate and interpret data.
      Climate change is natural, man is puny and gullible.
      I have no dog in this fight.

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  18. Michael Dalvean

    Research Assistant/Sessional Lecturer and Tutor, Politics at Australian National University

    Did the author of this study statistically control for age in the sample? There is a significant literature on the effects of increasing age on conservatism. Given that it was senior journalists who were found to be more conservative the results may simply reflect this phenomenon.

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    1. Folker Hanusch

      Senior Research Fellow at Queensland University of Technology

      In reply to Michael Dalvean

      Thanks Michael, and I emailed you directly a little while ago in response.
      The answer is yes, we did control for age. There was no significant correlation between age and political beliefs (measured as 0 to 10) or particular voting intentions.

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  19. Wilson Lockheed

    Fraud Investigator

    The mainstream media is compromised, this starts at the top, where for instance you have the likes of the Murdoch corporate entity that is 100% pro-Israel and committed to Zionism! Before the hordes of apologists and naysayers attack me for that comment, it is easily and quickly exposed with a few cursory search engine entries using keywords, Murdoch, Israel, Bias, Zionism etc...nothing sinister in the comment at all, go and look, there you will see the results. Below is a short quote from one of…

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    1. Pat Moore

      gardener

      In reply to Wilson Lockheed

      Thanks Wilson for photographing the elephant in the media zoo. Murdoch's primary allegiance, focus and cause is indeed for globalized Zionism, both by its US administration Wall St/ Whitehouse "swinging door" emanation and wider global capitalism project (which includes Australia) and by its Israeli political nationalist project which operates upon the US administration via AIPAC, finally exposed as definitely not a mad "conspiracy theory" by Jewish Professors Mearsheimer & Walt in "The Israeli…

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    2. Wilson Lockheed

      Fraud Investigator

      In reply to John Phillip

      John I understand that you are a grumpy old man, that's ok your allowed to be, but please do yourself and other readers a favour, have a think before you comment, you claim I have mentioned a "Zionist plot", I would like to point out to you that is not the case, please, read my comment again, I talk to the point of bias in the media, one area of bias is Israel centric or Zionist positive reporting, whether the reporter themselves have that skewed position when they are given the task of doing an…

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    3. John Phillip
      John Phillip is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Grumpy Old Man

      In reply to Wilson Lockheed

      Wilson, I'm afraid your declaration that the Murdoch media is dedicated to zionism kinda paints you that way. To insist that the organisation follows such a policy certainly seems a lot like claiming it is a conspiracy. Sorry my comment was so rude. It was reactionary. I just cant take your position seriously.

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    4. Wilson Lockheed

      Fraud Investigator

      In reply to John Phillip

      Murdoch Rupert, Mr is the media and the media is Murdoch, his background, and stance on Israel and its political and religious righteousness is well known, dedicated to Zionism, the phrase you used, is not just true for him, but also for his media outlets where he can influence opinion, the court of public opinion is shaped by his input, which disseminated then given legs by readers and watcher in a sort of self fulfilling cycle of tell the readers this, they then reinforce the story by quoting it…

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  20. Laurie Strachan

    Writer/photgrapher

    I spent about 40 years on newspapers and only once worked for an editor who was at all left of centre. He was Adrian Deamer on the Australian in the late 60s, early 70s and Murdoch sacked him because he wouldn't toe the right wing line. Journalists know what the owners think and so largely keep their mouths shut - except, of course, for the real power seekers and yes men, who actively promote their proprietors' views because that's the way to the top. Those I met lots of.

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  21. Theo Pertsinidis

    ALP voter

    Modern day disciples everywhere... but blasphemous modern day disciples rooted to evil in these cases.

    Just toeing the line and not being of your own character is being a prostitute.

    Read My Thoughts at https://sites.google.com/site/theopert

    I found Alan Austin's article pertaining to the Liberal Party budget reply speech as being honest and proportional for the event http://www.independentaustralia.net/2013/politics/tony-abbotts-budget-reply-porkie-pies

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  22. wilma western

    logged in via email @bigpond.com

    Various problems with this article. The findings might be accurate as far as they go , but there is a problem when a very significant number polled refused to state their political preferences. Also what were their interpretations of "left" and "right/conservative".? If someone regards "right/convservative" as backward -looking, not cool or up to date, he/she might be reluctant to choose this description.

    Further,for those who are interested in issues of bias , political journalists, opinion writers…

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  23. Andrew Inwood

    Statistician

    Hi Folker, we do this research every year, with a much bigger sample and produce a report called the Invisible Government (Hat tip to the founder of Propaganda Edward L Bernays) and then we track the articles.
    Essentially with the journalists what you see is what you get and what's really interesting if you do the linear research is how much each individual sings the song. Congrats though cracking read.

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  24. Norman Bradbury

    Renewalist

    Folker,

    Were the 83 seniors part of the 372 responders?

    If so, and given how journos appear not to allow their personal political views to influence their content, can one infer from this report(study) that 'unscrutinised' seniors/managers hold greater sway insofar as media influence upon the electorate at large.

    If not, can this be said of them anyway?

    My interest is in pinpointing where possible what media critics mean when they assail or blame "the media" etc..

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    1. Folker Hanusch

      Senior Research Fellow at Queensland University of Technology

      In reply to Norman Bradbury

      Hi Norman,

      it's difficult to pinpoint any media influence in general. Firstly, it's contentious whether voting intentions/political beliefs actually influence news reporting. If they do, arguably the stronger influence should come from senior editors, because they have the most power within newsrooms. Media have been shown to be setting agendas, but whether these actually influence individual voting decisions in the general population is not clear cut. Some voters even vote strategically, ie. they vote for a party they wouldn't normally vote for, just because they think the media influences most to vote for another party. Media probably play some part in voting intentions, but they're far from the only influence.

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    2. Norman Bradbury

      Renewalist

      In reply to Folker Hanusch

      Folker,

      Difficult, yes. Tho not to be avoided for all that.

      You wrote: "study has also found other largely unscrutinised biases remain – particularly whose views disproportionately shape the news."

      Would this be the place to try examine what influences the influencers?

      Perhaps transitioning from an age of mass labors' political bent we have come to that of mass marketing. And its tools.

      I presume that advertising and its revenues would be significant drivers of senior journalism/managerial media implementations. Would your unscrutinised embrace this aspect. Or would media expression of it be verboten!

      Yes, revenues buy jobs, but t'is the influencers I am concerned to know about.

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  25. Evan Hayward

    Long term academic facilitator

    Aunty. 73.6% Left, 14.7% Right. Balanced. The taxpayers (not "our" since they PAY ours) dollar.

    Well spent?

    How much should a media corporation which is so far skewed from public perception be forcibly funded by that public?

    Conservatives and Libertarians (plus the miniscule fringe right) make up over 55% of Australians right now, but the publicly funded "non-partisan" national broadcaster leans five to one towards socialism.How representative is that?

    The disproportionate lean to the left in the media (and in the ABC in particular) has until now been anecdotal. The media, especially the ABC, have become organs of the government. The population just needs to be (re)educated. Direct me to the nearest gulag now, please.

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    1. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Evan Hayward

      I'm not sure what an academic faciltator actually does - perhaps they raise children and pack them off to colleges...

      But are you actually suggesting that the ABC - or anything else for that matter - should be somehow "elected" by opinion polls?

      It is actually possible to watch ABC news and still dislike Julia Gillard you know. Obviously really when one does the maths.

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    2. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Evan Hayward

      It seems that Evan Hayward has not watched or listened to the ABC.

      As pointed out in the article, the main influence on journalistic output is the editorial direction, and this is biased to the right.

      The most extreme bias I've seen recently is the Q&A where the high school students asked the PM questions. The ABC didn't include a single question on climate change.

      But to Evan the ABC is probably biased because they devoted the show the the PM.

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    3. Ronald Ostrowski

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Having watched Leigh Sales and Chris Ulhmann in action I would say that the ABC is clearly pro-LNP. No question, and for this reason I have boycotted it. For a conservative like me there is only the middle ground, which is the current manifestation of the neo-Liberalist leaning ALP. I will not even entertain the bizarre economic proposals and extremism of the Abbott led LNP be it on even admitting or tackling climate change or any other issue.

      There is currently an open letter to the ABC's…

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    4. Michael Wilbur-Ham (MWH)

      Writer (ex telecommunications engineer)

      In reply to Ronald Ostrowski

      I find the bias of the 7:30 report so obnoxious and unprofessional that I too no longer watch it.

      So far this month the 7pm ABC TV News in Melbourne has only had two menions of the federal Greens (with video) and one mention of the state Greens (just in voiceover).

      GIven that so much has happened this month both state and federal where the Greens are the main opposing voice in parliament this amounts, to me, to rather blatant bias.

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  26. Liz Minchin

    Queensland Editor at The Conversation

    Just a reminder to everyone of The Conversation's Community Standards: https://theconversation.com/au/community_standards

    We welcome feisty debate, but having a go at people's intelligence on the basis of being right- or left-wing, or generally getting personal in your comments, is not helpful.

    We don't want to stop people discussing topics they are enthusiastic about, but we do ask users to find ways of sharing their views that do not feel divisive, threatening or toxic to others. Personal attacks are a direct violation of these guidelines and are grounds for immediate and permanent suspension of access to all or part of The Conversation service.

    As the link above says: The Conversation belongs to everybody. We want this to be a welcoming space for intelligent discussion. Thanks for being part of it.

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    1. Peter Hindrup

      consultant

      In reply to Liz Minchin

      Timely, in my view. Seems to me that it could also have been issued in the Academics and activism: thread.

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    2. Wilson Lockheed

      Fraud Investigator

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      Hear Hear Peter, absolutely disgusting some peoples comments regarding vulnerable and marginalised people from the harshest of circumstances, very little humanity left to go around these days.

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  27. Evelyn Haskins

    retired

    Who said that "Labor" was left wing?

    The Right Wing of Labor which is curently in power is significantly right of the Coalition's Left.

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  28. Peter Johnstone

    logged in via Twitter

    I have 2 questions about this article:
    Who benefits from the outcomes of the 'survey'? Whose narrative does it reinforce?
    I think News Ltd and IPA will be delighted and use it.
    34 Journalists in the ABC responded? Give me a break

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  29. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

    Boss

    Here is a practical, easy, post-poll test. Listen to a broadcaster you seek to test, let's say ABC TV. Pick out a mathematically valid error from the many they make daily (Like: there has been 0.2 deg/decade of global warming for the past 20 years).
    File an official complaint based on numbers, which they are more required to address than a complaint based on opinion. See what evasive answers you get, if any.
    I've never got any response of substance, even after warning that their gardening show…

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  30. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

    Boss

    Here's another measure. In 1986 I was involved as a character in "Four Corners". Hosted K.O'B. for a couple of days. Repeatedly told him and his film crew that they were gathering material from a place that had nothing to do with the proposed story. Was assured that they would not use it.

    They did. With really leftist overtones.

    Ever since, I've been waiting for that host to get a Eureka moment about the truth in reporting. I'm still waiting.

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  31. Gregory Melleuish

    Associate Professor, School of History and Politics at University of Wollongong

    These figures are interesting but it would be even better if they were broken down even further. For example are journalists in the regions different from those in the capitals? Or even is there a difference between Sydney, Melbourne , Canberra and the rest of the country? My perception is that the ABC is different in the regions to the cities but it would be good if there was evidence to either prove or disprove this view. It's just that overall figures can sometimes be misleading.

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  32. Metta Bhavana

    logged in via Facebook

    "This [research] suggests that Australia’s media bosses are more in line with the broader electorate,,," Er, no it doesn't. Media "bosses" would surely have little in common with the diverse social cohort lumped together as the "broader" electorate: different education, different income, different life experiences, different allegiances. On these differences, it is unlikely they would by coincidence be a close match on voting intention.The only conclusion is that those with most power in the media…

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  33. Evelyn Haskins

    retired

    Isn't this discussion about a poor survey purported to be a sudy a little contrived?

    We ALL know who controls the media and therefore who gets voted in.

    The Advertisers.

    As we get more and more foreign investments here, the more the papers will reflect these companies' boards views, and we'll all vote to lie down and enjoy the rape of our resources for Big Business gain.

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    1. Norman Bradbury

      Renewalist

      In reply to Evelyn Haskins

      Dash it, Evelyn, I must have appeared so naive in earlier comments.

      When all the while I was both finding my feet here and hoping raise the specter(spectre) of mass monetizing. And its tools - i.e. so-termed targeted participants. Not to mention fools!

      Still, there y'all go ( to borrow from J.L.Burke).

      Maybe it will come up some other time and place. And if it does I'd appreciate receiving a tap, so to say.

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    2. Steve Bloomberg

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to Evelyn Haskins

      That might also account in part for the approach to demographic change and immigration to keep wages down?

      "In the context of criticising the federal parliament for insufficient ethnic diversity, columnist George Megalogenis implied that the institution is too white and that whiteness reduces openness: “It has become more monochrome at the very moment we need to pursue more openness—in markets and in immigration” (Weekend Australian, July 21–22[31]).

      The media review also revealed a pronounced…

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    3. Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Boss

      In reply to Steve Bloomberg

      Steve,
      Well bless my soul, in Victoria this last week, a black footballer (who seemed by appearance to be half white as well, but that does not matter, it happens) took up column inches of news because a pubescent girl from Collingwood foopball club yelled something at him. Oh, it was so precious and the leftists loved it. Over and over.
      Compare this to an experience where I flew into western Arnhem land, left the pilot and alone, faced a mob of about 200 locals from where white man could not go without a permit, a crowd that had been stirred up to open hostility by one John Ah Kit, a part Asian/part indigene, who would have been a primary cause if I had met harm. That was not so precious, it was dangerous and alcohol fuelled, but it did not make news.

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    4. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Geoffrey Harold Sherrington

      Too right Geoff!

      What sort of country is this coming to where a decent young white kiddie can't call a spade an ape?

      Where a decent pure Englishman is forced - alone - to stare down a horde of half-castes and mongrel hordes just because he wants to dig up a bit of ore? Where were our troopers?

      Where the sons of Cromwell must obtain pagan permission to walk free on the Queen's own country?

      Where the lesser races with openly Greekish names dominate our footy codes?

      The whole place is going to hell in a hand-basket. And that basket is woven by half-castes with foreign flax..

      I am shocked and appalled by your moving anecdote. Yes I am.

      Bring back the lash. Give the police bayonettes.

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    5. Peter Hindrup

      consultant

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      Peter Old Chap, you with your wimpish ways are a disgrace to the Empire!

      You know that we must keep control of these ---- for their own good of course, we know that they cannot govern themselves, feed themselves and would live in squalor with our help!!,

      You really must smarten up Old Chap or we will have to send you back the the old country --- one bad apple and all of that.

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    6. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Peter Hindrup

      I take your point Peter ... the bayonette is not that much sharper a substitute for a stiff upper lip.

      Lord knows we've tried - carrying on in the tradition of Kipling - shouldering our destined burdens with grim and gritty resignation - bringing the benefits of quarrying and fermentation to the lesser hordes. But do they thank us? Do they simply succumb to our social superiority and assimilate themselves away?

      Not a bar of it. They persist and carry on with their darkness. Refusing to…

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    7. Peter Hindrup

      consultant

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      Quick question: Apart form Australia, do you know of any country that was colonised that did not have conspicuous wealth, and/resources for the 'taking'.

      Any country colonised that having had their resources plundered were not left with their societies destroyed, and worse off than before their colonisation?

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    8. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Peter Hindrup

      England apparently Peter.... all their colonisers have been totally benign - generous to a fault and only went there for the weather and the food.

      The ancient peoples - the Angles, Saxons, Picts and the like continued to live on harmoniously tending their fields, running their shops - merging smoothly with their various overlords. And these overlords - driven by mercy and a generosity of spirit - gave them democracy, welfare state, council houses, Bill Shakespeare and the best little language…

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    9. Doug Hutcheson

      Poet

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      "a globalised Saint Vincent de Paul operation - but with bayonettes" sounds suspiciously like a Crusade, in which the peaceful were converted for their own good. Once led to the ways of the righteous and shown their subservient rôle, the populations of those lesser countries should have lived in harmony with their ordained rulers, but did they show gratitude for having been led from the darkness to the light? Did they heck!

      The modern crusades are fought in the share-markets of the world and reported upon by the MSM, who work hard to bring the unvarnished truth to the little people. It is a world in which News Ltd and Andrew Blot wield their benign powers for the good of those incapable of thinking for themselves. Aren't we lucky to have them watching out for us?

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    10. Peter Hindrup

      consultant

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      AH, thank you for putting me straight. I had forgotten that 'we' (the Brits), try as they might could never teach the Egyptians anything --- after 'we' had learned all they could teach us about working cotton, and closed down their industries at gun point so tt they could not compete with us.

      Had misremembered too, that 'we could teach the Indians nothing about working steel after we had learned all we could of their techniques, and closed their steel mills at gun point so that they couldn't compete with 'us'.

      One ought not ever forget!

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    11. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Doug Hutcheson

      Yes Doug we must thank god - the White One - for his gift of the Andrew Blots, Alan Jones and the like who keep our eyes on the paths of righteousness and due subservience to the proper authorities and all things decent.

      We are so lucky to have such pillars of propriety living amongst us - and so fortunate that the virtue of their views is recognised by the likes of editors and proprietors alike.

      Sort of keeps one's faith alive doesn't it?

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    12. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Peter Hindrup

      I put the blame squarely where it belongs Peter - the decline of Kipling in the marxist dominated media! That and the decline of scouting in the modern materialist era.

      When will we see serialised epics of uplifting moral works gracing the pages of the SMH and Orstrayan?

      Sure the Blots and Devines try as best they can to serve up a daily Kellog's dose of moral fibre - but nothing can surpass the divinely inspired verse of the true classics. Like this:

      "Take up the White Man's burden…

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    13. Doug Hutcheson

      Poet

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      "due subservience to the proper authorities and all things decent" is precisely the attitude reflected by the Letters to the Editor in my local (rural QLD) newspaper. No long-haired, jeans-wearing, pot-smoking, slogan-chanting, rabble-rousing, pinko neo-hippies, or their apologists, get their letters published in OUR organ of the people God has ordained to reign over us. Harrumph! I can feel a letter to the editor building up in me as I write!

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    14. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to Doug Hutcheson

      The trick to getting one's opinions published in the "marxist dominated media" Doug is not to argue the toss ... but to agree with them 300%... take their delusional fantasies a few more stops along the road to a benign dictatorship by decent god fearing fogeys ... crushing papism while we're at it - and anything else that could conceivably be considered ungodly, indecent or untoward.

      Demand the return of proven punishments - the lash, the rope and stoning for adultery or wearing shorts.

      The pompous all suffer from a poorly developed sense of irony.

      The works of one Henry Root are well worth a google.

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    15. Peter Hindrup

      consultant

      In reply to Doug Hutcheson

      To Peter: I concede!

      Nice to know that others note the the difference between the preached and the reality.

      Doug: Lived for eleven years, not so long ago, where such a paper existed, except they would not publish anything that criticised the council, which was corrupt and incompetent, and nothing from the farming community.

      I suggested to the farmers/contractors that they pull their advertising, but that offended their sensibilities. Came the time when I handed the editor a letter and…

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    16. Chris Saunders

      retired

      In reply to Peter Hindrup

      Sharing a similar frustration to the point of hopelessness at ever being published in the SMH just recently I struck lucky with yes, a letter which agreed with the thoughts of whoever was on duty that night. However, I don’t know if anyone has noticed, but their letters' pages boast letters from female correspondents over the past few months in concentrations never before seen. Have the men fled, just as they did union membership and left it to the girls? Who knows, but dash me I’ve lost interest.

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    17. ernest malley

      farmer

      In reply to Peter Ormonde

      Possibly the phrases you seek would be in "Recessional" with its reference to ruling "... lesser breeds without the Law.." though it didn't specify whose L-A-W, nor to what ends.
      Modern revisionists now claim that it warn't them tinted brethren but Germans being denigrated which is a hell of a long bow to draw.
      Whether one likes Kipling probably depends on how long since one last Kippled.

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    18. Peter Ormonde
      Peter Ormonde is a Friend of The Conversation.

      Farmer

      In reply to ernest malley

      Yes Ern ... Kipling is an acquired taste - like rabies or leprosy ... or perhaps some sort of "social disease". Should be shots for it.

      But when it comes to LAW it'd be God's own I'd wager ... as bestowed by Himself on the English by Moses when he descended Mount Sinai bearing the book of common prayer and a few tomes of common law chiselled in cold cornish granite.

      Strangely though this English set of commandments didn't touch on matters murderous or larceny - save to sanction any and all such crimes done on behalf of Queen and Country. The Lord helps those who help themselves. And they did. Everywhere they could.

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  34. Tim Spence

    logged in via Facebook

    Firstly, any chance of getting the actual poll results? Or do we have to wait for the publication of the AJR?

    Secondly, the voting intention's sub-group is next to useless, even if you took into account the smaller sample size, the fact that up to 42% didn't answer the question means the sample is corrupted, it's no longer a true sample because the people who don't want to answer that question are excluded (which they can't be in a true sample). Adjusting for a smaller sample size doesn't help…

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  35. mick smith

    na

    It would have to be as clear as mud to anyone following the political debate for the past 5 years that the media has run a one sided pro Liberal campaign. Daily one reads about what the new problem with Labor is whilst Tony Abbott for the most part escapes any genuine scrutiny.

    One has to ask the obvious questions:

    1. Who owns 'the media'? Is it big business (yes!)
    2. Is it in the interests of big business to get a Liberal government? One only needs to look at the money trail leading from…

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  36. Shanti Des Fours

    logged in via Facebook

    Hi

    Where can I find this study by the Sunshine Coast University? Had a bit of a search but couldn't figure it out.

    Thanks
    Shanti

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