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Articles on Friday essay

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John Kinsella, top right, and (clockwise), Kwame Dawes, Thurston Moore and Charmaine Papertalk Green. Courtesy Tamati Smith, The Thurston Moore Group, the University of Nebraska

Friday essay: writing poems across oceans, cultures and emails – John Kinsella on creative collaboration

How do you write a poem with someone else? John Kinsella has collaborated with musician Thurston Moore, Yamaji poet Charmaine Papertalk Green and Ghanaian-Jamaican Kwame Dawes. He offers some clues.
Gabrielle Chanel, photograph by Henry Clarke, published in Vogue France, 1954. Paris Musées. © Henry Clarke, Paris Musées / Palais Galliera / ADAGP. Copyright Agency, 2021

Friday essay: Chanel’s complex legacy

Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel transformed women’s fashion across the world: how do we recognise her complex background, difficult choices and ongoing legacy?
Breastplate, of metal, engraved ‘McIntyre King of Mannilla’, c.1860–1874. ‘King’ McIntyre (c.1814–74) . Donated by A.W. Wilkins to Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, 1930. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery

Friday essay: Indigenous afterlives in Britain

The Ancestral Remains of Aboriginal people still lie in British museums or in graves, marked and unmarked.
Mary Elizabeth Shutler in Vanuatu, in the1960s. Permitted to join the first archaeological expedition to New Caledonia in 1952 as a ‘voluntary assistant’, she was the only French speaker and chief interlocuter with the Kanak people. Family archives, reproduced with the kind authorisation of John Shutler & Susan Arter.

Friday essay: invisible no more – putting the first women archaeologists of the Pacific back on the map

‘Wives’, volunteers, assistants: the vital contribution of women archaeologists has long been underplayed, if not erased. A new project uncovers trailblazers in the Pacific.
Hoda Afshar’s exhibition Remain, The Substation, Melbourne, 2019. Photograph by Leela Schauble. Courtesy the artist and The Substation, Melbourne

Friday essay: 10 photography exhibitions that defined Australia

From the Intercolonial Exhibition in 1866 to a landmark show, a century later, in which Aboriginal photographers displayed their works, photography has shaped the nation.
Paula Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train has sold 23 million copies, and the film adaptation was a box office smash. DreamWorks Pictures/Universal Pictures via AP

Friday essay: beyond ‘girl gone mad melodrama’ — reframing female anger in psychological thrillers

There’s something disturbing about a story tracking a character’s mental decline for thrills. Happily, Paula Hawkins’ new novel, A Slow Fire Burning, joins a genre of books bucking this trend.

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