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Articles on Indigenous people

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John James Audubon relied on African Americans and Native Americans to collect some specimens for his ‘Birds of America’ prints (shown: Florida cormorant), but never credited them. National Audubon Society

American environmentalism’s racist roots have shaped global thinking about conservation

US ideas about conservation center on walling off land from use. That approach often means expelling Indigenous and other poor people who may be its most effective caretakers.
Funeral for a woman and her 11-year-old daughter, both found dead inside a burnt out vehicle in Puebla state, Mexico, June 11, 2020. Jose Castanares/AFP via Getty Images)

Latin American women are disappearing and dying under lockdown

Reports of rape, domestic abuse and murdered women are way up in Brazil, Mexico, Peru and beyond since the coronavirus. But Latin America has long been one of the most dangerous places to be a woman.
Delegates from 34 Native tribes at the Creek Council House in Indian Territory, now called Oklahoma, 1880. National Archives

Oklahoma is – and always has been – Native land

The Supreme Court's July 9 ruling that half of Oklahoma belongs to the Muscogee Nation confirms what Indigenous people already knew: North America is 'Indian Country.'
Satere-mawe Indigenous men in face masks paddle the Ariau River in hard-hit Manaus state during the coronavirus pandemic, May 5, 2020. Ricardo Oliveira /AFP via Getty Images

Judge orders Brazil to protect Indigenous people from ravages of COVID-19

The Bolsonaro government cannot simply allow Brazil's out-of-control coronavirus pandemic to decimate its Indigenous population, Brazil's Supreme Court says.
Satere-mawe Indigenous men in face masks paddle the Ariau River, in hard-hit Manaus state, during the coronavirus pandemic, May 5, 2020. Ricardo Oliveira /AFP via Getty Images

Brazil’s Bolsonaro has COVID-19 – and so do thousands of Indigenous people who live days from the nearest hospital

Indigenous communities were already suffering badly under Bolsonaro. Now, COVID-19 threatens their very survival.
At the Navajo Nation town of Fort Defiance, Arizona, staff pack food boxes. The Navajo Nation now has the highest per capita COVID-19 infection rate in the U.S. Getty Images / Mark Ralston

As Arizona coronavirus cases surge from early reopening, Indigenous nations suffer not only more COVID-19 but also the blame

Tribal lands are hot spots for COVID-19 infections and deaths. Racism is one of the reasons.
Ceremonial cape designs by Mexica (Aztec) artists who created the Codex Magliabechiano in the mid-1500s. Tonatiu (left) represents the sun deity and ‘ataduras’ (right) depicts bindings. The Book of the Life of Ancient Mexicans, Z. Nuttall (1903)

Coronavirus: Europeans introduced devastating novel diseases to the Indigenous Americas – here’s what the survivors learned

When colonisers invaded the Americas, they brought with them waves of new diseases. This legacy continues to impact Indigenous communities.
South America’s bi-oceanic highway, which will stretch from the Pacific to the Atlantic – cutting right through Paraguay – is scheduled for completion in 2022. Joel Correia

Mennonites helped turn Paraguay into a mega beef producer – indigenous people may pay the price

Mennonites settled in Paraguay's arid Chaco forest a century ago, fleeing religious persecution. Their agricultural success is now driving deforestation, social change and rapid development.
Punta Ventana, a popular tourist attraction near Guayanilla, Puerto Rico, before and after the Jan. 6 earthquake. AFP/Getty/Wikipedia

Puerto Rico earthquakes imperil island’s indigenous heritage

Puerto Rico was once home to about 110,000 Taínos, an indigenous people decimated by the Spanish conquest. Their ancient homeland was located in the area hit hard by recent earthquakes.
A supporter of former Bolivian president Evo Morales tells a police officer to respect the nation’s indigenous people, in La Paz, Bolivia, Nov. 12, 2019. AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko

Bolivia after Morales: An ‘ungovernable country’ with a power vacuum

Evo Morales is at least the ninth Bolivian president to by forced out of office by a mass uprising. But even in exile he remains by far the most popular politician in the country.
Supporters of former Bolivian president Evo Morales rally with indigenous flags outside the city of Cochabamba, Bolivia, Nov. 18, 2019. AP Photo/Juan Karita

Old religious tensions resurge in Bolivia after ouster of longtime indigenous president

Indigenous people, symbols and religious practices filled the halls of power in Bolivia during Evo Morales' 14-year tenure. Now a new conservative Christian leader seems to be erasing that legacy.
Revelers dressed as Catrina, an iconic Day of the Dead skeleton, at a holiday parade in Mexico City, Oct. 21, 2018. Reuters/Andres Stapff

Day of the Dead: From Aztec goddess worship to modern Mexican celebration

It may sound like a solemn affair, but the Day of the Dead – which blends indigenous and Catholic ritual – is a convivial celebration that allows Mexicans to reconnect with deceased loved ones.
Indigenous Marind in West Papua consider the forest and its plants and animals as kin. These culturally valued multispecies relations, however, are being disrupted by oil palm development projects. Sophie Chao

In West Papua, oil palm expansion undermines the relations of indigenous Marind people to forest plants and animals

Indigenous Marind in West Papua consider the forest and its plants and animals as kin. These culturally valued multispecies relations, however, are being disrupted by oil palm development projects.

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