Articles on Jair Bolsonaro

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Satere-mawe Indigenous men in face masks paddle the Ariau River in hard-hit Manaus state during the coronavirus pandemic, May 5, 2020. Ricardo Oliveira /AFP via Getty Images

Judge orders Brazil to protect Indigenous people from ravages of COVID-19

The Bolsonaro government cannot simply allow Brazil's out-of-control coronavirus pandemic to decimate its Indigenous population, Brazil's Supreme Court says.
President Donald Trump at the Tulsa campaign rally, where he said he had slowed down COVID-19 testing to keep the numbers low. Win McNamee/Getty Images

Leaders like Trump fail if they cannot speak the truth and earn trust

The absence of trust in a nation's leader and government jeopardizes an effective response to a health crisis. It also creates a political crisis, a loss of faith in democracy.
Satere-mawe Indigenous men in face masks paddle the Ariau River, in hard-hit Manaus state, during the coronavirus pandemic, May 5, 2020. Ricardo Oliveira /AFP via Getty Images

Brazil’s Bolsonaro has COVID-19 – and so do thousands of Indigenous people who live days from the nearest hospital

Indigenous communities were already suffering badly under Bolsonaro. Now, COVID-19 threatens their very survival.
There are more than 3,600 territories in Brazil that are home to Quilombola, descendants of escaped slaves, but few hold titles to the land. (Elielson Pereira da Silva)

Indigenous and Afro-Brazilian lands are under greater threat in Brazil during COVID-19

Jair Bolsonaro's government has put forward laws that could put Indigenous land into the hands of mining, agricultural and timber businesses.
South African president Cyril Ramaphosa and German chancellor Angela Merkel have shown good leadership in the fight against COVID-19. GCIS

What sets good and bad leaders apart in the coronavirus era

It is no accident that those leaders who have responded worst to this crisis have also been the main sources of countless conspiracy theories and misinformation.
Antonio, from the Yanomami village of Watoriki, photographed in November 1992. After contact with Brazilian society in the 1970s, more than half the Yanomami population died from infectious diseases. William Milliken

Covid-19, isolated indigenous peoples and the history of the Amazon

There are telling parallels between the current pandemic and those that decimated indigenous populations in the post-Columbian era in the Amazon.
Collecting firewood on the Waiapi indigenous reserve in Amapa state, Brazil, Oct. 13, 2017. A new bill could open Brazil’s Native lands to development. APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images

Indigenous people may be the Amazon’s last hope

Native Brazilians are among the Amazon's most effective defenders against logging and mining, because they're fighting not just for the environment but for their people's very survival.
In this March 2018 photo, Venezuelan children wait for a meal at a migrant shelter set up in Boa Vista, Roraima state, Brazil. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

Brazil’s humane refugee policies: Good ideas can travel north

If Brazil can find an efficient, pragmatic way to welcome, protect and integrate hundreds of thousands of forced migrants arriving at its border, so can more affluent states.
Venezuelan migrants look at the Panamericana Highway, in Urbina, Ecuador. More than 4.5 million Venezuelans have fled to neighbouring countries like Brazil, where they must navigate anti-migrant politicians. LGBTQ+ refugees in South America have only one dedicated centre — Casa Miga — to turn to. AP Photo/Edu Leon

More protection urgently needed for Venezuelan LGBTQ+ refugees in Brazil

The only centre for LGBTQ+ refugees in Latin America is overwhelmed by demand and is struggling to take in refugees from Venezuela.
Two autocrats: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, left, and Hungarian leader Viktor Orban, right, in Budapest, Hungary, Nov. 7, 2019. AP/Presidential Press Service

So you want to be an autocrat? Here’s the 10-point checklist

Today’s autocrats rarely use brute force to wrest control. A human rights and international law scholar details the modern authoritarian's latest methods to grab and hold power.

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