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Articles on Marsupials

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Smithsonian Institution/colourised by D.S. Rovinsky

The Tasmanian tiger was hunted to extinction as a ‘large predator’ – but it was only half as heavy as we thought

The “Tasmanian tiger” was hunted to extinction based on its perceived size as a predator big enough to take sheep. But it seems this was just a tall tale, and the thylacine weighed just 16.7kg.
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A rare discovery: we found the sugar glider is actually three species, but one is disappearing fast

The sugar glider is an icon of the Australian bush. But discovering it's actually three distinct species has big consequences for its conservation.
Life and death in tropical Australia, 40,000 years ago. Giant reptiles ruled northern Australia during the Pleistocene with mega-marsupials as their prey. Image Credit: R. Bargiel, V. Konstantinov, A. Atuchin & S. Hocknull (2020). Queensland Museum.

Humans coexisted with three-tonne marsupials and lizards as long as cars in ancient Australia

These megafauna were the largest land animals to live in Australia since the time of the dinosaurs.
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One little bandicoot can dig up an elephant’s worth of soil a year – and our ecosystem loves it

These Aussie diggers boost the health of our soils. But up until recently, we didn’t know just how much soil they can turn over (hint: it’s a lot).
Eastern quolls have been introduced in Booderee Nation Park as part of a rewilding project. Oisin Sweeney

We can ‘rewild’ swathes of Australia by focusing on what makes it unique

Rewilding is gaining popularity around the world, as a means to restore ecosystems to their ancient state. But just like Vegemite, Australian rewilding projects need to have a unique flavour.
Most Australian kangaroo species, such as the bettong, are largely out of sight and out of mind. AAP Image/EPA

Yes, kangaroos are endangered – but not the species you think

A new documentary makes some controversial claims about the health of kangaroo populations. But the real threat is not to Australia’s iconic kangaroos – it’s to dozens of other, obscure species.

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