Articles on Sea ice

Displaying 1 - 20 of 45 articles

This Arctic heat wave has been unusually long-lived. The darkest reds on this map of the Arctic are areas that were more than 14 degrees Fahrenheit warmer in the spring of 2020 compared to the recent 15-year average. Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory

100 degrees in Siberia? 5 ways the extreme Arctic heat wave follows a disturbing pattern

The Arctic is warming about twice as fast as the planet as a whole, with serious consequences. Scientists have been warning about this for decades.
The new model predicts the growth of small ponds on arctic ice sheets. Scientific Visualization Studio / NASA

Video: How simple math can help predict the melting of sea ice

Understanding sea ice loss requires expensive and difficult expeditions. Scientists have developed a new model that predicts the growth of small ponds on sea ice more efficiently.
Over 100,000 narwhals swim the Earth’s Arctic waters. Kristin Laidre

Meet the narwhal, ‘unicorn of the sea’

The long tusk of the male narwhal earned these whales their fanciful nickname. But there's more to these Arctic mammals than their unique spiral tooth.
A scientist checks cracks in the Arctic sea ice after a storm (April 2015, N-ICE2015 expedition). Amelie Meyer/NPI

Winter storms are speeding up the loss of Arctic sea ice

Warm summers aren't the only threat to Arctic ice – increasingly intense winter storms are also weakening and reducing ice cover.
Sea ice responds to changes in winds and ocean currents, sometimes with origins thousands of kilometres away. NASA/Nathan Kurtz

Why Antarctica’s sea ice cover is so low (and no, it’s not just about climate change)

Antarctic sea ice cover fell to an all-time low recently and hasn't yet recovered. Why? The initial answers could lie in an unlikely place – the tropics.
A pod of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in central Baffin Bay. Narwhals are the most vulnerable animals to increased ship traffic in the Arctic Ocean. Kristin Laidre/University of Washington

As Arctic ship traffic increases, narwhals and other unique animals are at risk

Climate change is shrinking Arctic sea ice and opening the region to ship traffic. Whales, seals and other marine mammals could be at risk unless nations adopt rules to protect them.
The northeast edge of the Venable Ice Shelf, near Antarctica’s Allison Peninsula. NASA/John Sonntag

Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate

Last summer one of Antarctica's floating ice shelves calved an iceberg the size of Delaware – but scientists say other less dramatic changes reveal more about how and why Antarctica is changing.

Top contributors

More