Menu Close

Articles on Vaccine hesitancy

Displaying 1 - 20 of 91 articles

Tens of millions of people in Britain have taken a vaccine – and the sheer volume of uptake may convince the hesitant to do the same. Andy Rain/EPA-EFE

Why COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy should fall as more people get the jab

If we think about the success of the UK’s vaccine rollout to date, and factor in how social norms tend to diffuse, then there's good reason to be optimistic.
A healthcare worker holds up a vial of the AstraZeneca vaccine at a COVID-19 vaccination clinic in Montréal, on March 18. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson 

Second dose of AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine: FAQs about blood clots, safety, risks and symptoms

Answers to key questions about rare blood clots linked to AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine, including risks, symptoms and whether people who have had one AstraZeneca shot should have a second.
Little work has been done to understand young people’s willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccines. Above: a COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the University of Toronto Mississauga campus on May 6. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin 

How to increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake and decrease vaccine hesitancy in young people

As vaccine eligibility is expanded to adolescents and young adults, understanding who might be more likely to be vaccine hesitant, and why, can help inform public health strategies
A health worker administers an injection to a child below the age of one year during a routine immunisation at a health center in Kampala, Uganda. Xinhua/Nicholas Kajoba via Getty Images

Low trust in authorities affects vaccine uptake: evidence from 22 African countries

Even where vaccines are available, one barrier to progress is vaccine hesitancy: the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate.
See, no crying or big needles, just a person of colour showing off his plaster. This image does the job without scaring people and demonstrates diversity. from www.shutterstock.com

Pictures of COVID injections can scare the pants off people with needle phobias. Use these instead

Our well-meaning efforts to use images to help demystify the vaccination process or share our pride in getting a COVID vaccine can backfire.
A healthcare worker administers an Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine to her colleague at Mutuini Hospital in Nairobi. Kenya on March 3, 2021. Photo by Dennis Sigwe/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Kenya’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout has got off to a slow start: the gaps, and how to fix them

Kenya grapples with two major challenges in the vaccination rollout: access to sufficient doses in light of the global shortage; and vaccine hesitancy.

Top contributors

More