Articles on World War II

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The Capital One Arena, home of the Washington Capitals, sits empty. AP Photo/Nick Wass

A world without sports

This isn't the first time sports have been put on hold. But in the past, the reprieve was brief, and sports went on to act as a way to bring Americans together. This time's different.
President Donald Trump shakes hands with Walmart CEO Doug McMillon at a White House press conference joining government and corporate officials – but no representatives of workers. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Workers left out of government and business response to the coronavirus

If government and business collaborate with workers, a scholar of labor relations writes, current economic problems could get less severe, the recovery smoother and lasting prosperity more likely.
Two Marines in the Marine Corps’ 5th Division cemetery on Iwo Jima pay their respects to a fallen comrade. United States Marine Corps Film Repository, USMC 101863 (16mm film frame)

Historic Iwo Jima footage shows individual Marines amid the larger battle

Films of the battle for Iwo Jima, being digitized 75 years after they were made, offer connections and lessons for Americans of today.
President Donald Trump congratulates newly naturalized citizens via a recorded message at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Miami field office. AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

Supreme Court allows public charge clause that kept Nazi-era refugees from the US

During the Nazi era, roughly 300,000 additional Jewish refugees could have gained entry to the US. But the immigration law’s 'likely to become a public charge' clause kept them out.
Jewish youth on a sailboat in Salonika harbor, 1929, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of Gabriel Albocher

Vital Hasson, the Jew who worked for the Nazis, hunted down refugees and tore apart families in WWII Greece

Vital Hasson was born into the Jewish community of Salonica, Greece, a cultural capital of the Sephardic world. After World War II, he was executed for helping the Nazis destroy that community.
A large group of American male Reserve Officers Training Corps students gather to protest the U.S. draft in the late 1930s. Anthony Potter Collection/Getty Images

Worrying about being drafted doesn’t mean you’re disloyal – it’s an old American tradition

An Iranian general's killing sparked fears of war and a draft in the US. Those are old fears, says a scholar who contends it's a myth that during the two world wars, men signed up in droves to fight.
French President Emmanuel Macron, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump meet the press at the 2019 NATO summit in London. AP Photo/ Evan Vucci

At 70, is NATO still important? 5 essential reads

As the North Atlantic Treaty Organization celebrates its 70th anniversary with a leaders' meeting in London, five US scholars shed light on NATO's history and its potential future.
A British Pattern 1907 bayonet with leather scabbard. Wikimedia Commons

Friday essay: a short, sharp history of the bayonet

There is no weapon more visceral than the bayonet. It encourages an intimate form of killing, and during WW1, Australia troops plunged, parried and stabbed with great vigour.
Vietnam veteran Marvin Nolin of Dover, Tenn., visits the Poppy Wall of Honor on the National Mall in Washington, Friday, May 24, 2019. Carolyn Kaster/AP Photo

Health care workers wanted: A veteran needs you to work at a VA hospital

Americans say they love their veterans, but a sad fact has emerged that betrays that profession. Huge vacancies in VA medical centers means that veterans are not getting the health care they need.

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