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Articles sur John McCain

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President Donald Trump, flanked by administration and public health officials, during a briefing on the coronavirus on March 25. Getty/Mandel Ngan / AFP

It’s a bad idea for journalists to censor Trump – instead, they can help the public identify what’s true or false

Journalism's ethics code says the press must 'seek truth and report it,' and also minimize harm. During a public health crisis, how should the press deal with President Trump's inaccuracies and lies?
Mitt Romney is sworn in as senator on Jan. 3, 2019 at the Old Senate Chambers in the U.S. Capitol. REUTERS/Jack Gruber-USA TODAY

Romney’s Mormon religion helps explain his criticism of Trump

Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah is one of the very few GOP critics of President Trump's character and leadership. Why has he staked out this lonely position? His Mormon faith.
James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo win the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their foundational work on cancer immunotherapy. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Kyoto University

2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: a turning point in the war on cancer

James Allison and Tasuku Honjo won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for encouraging immune cells to attack cancer. See how their work has revolutionized cancer therapies and medicine.
Eroding civility is not just a U.S. phenomenon. We need to learn how to speak to each other, no matter what our politics. (Shutterstock)

Making society civil again

Eroding civility is not just an American phenomenon; it's global. But it's time for a return to civility as we reflect on how we will be judged and remembered when the dust of history settles upon us.
A United Nations staff member pays tribute to Kofi Annan during a ceremony at the European headquarters of the UN in Geneva, Switzerland. EPA-EFE/ Salvatore Di Nolfi

Honouring Annan, McCain and others: why eulogies have blind spots

Kofi Annan and John McCain's positive eulogies could be because both men seized moments of human dignity and decency.
In what became one of the defining moments of his unsuccessful 2008 presidential campaign, Republican candidate John McCain takes back the microphone from Gayle Quinnell, who said Barack Obama “was an Arab.” The moment occurred during a town hall meeting on Oct. 10, 2008, in Lakeville, Minn. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

What we can learn from John McCain’s civic vulnerability

John McCain did something during the 2008 U.S. presidential election that would seem very out of place today: he made himself vulnerable by speaking up about the character of opponent Barack Obama.
Sen. John McCain pictured at a rally Oct. 15, 2014 in Marietta, Georgia to support Senate candidate David Perdue, who was elected a few weeks later. John Amis/AP Photo

Why McCain and all POWs deserve our profound respect and gratitude

Prisoners of war experience trauma, torture, humiliation and profound loneliness. A trauma psychologist explains how the effects can be lasting – and that Americans' gratitude should also be.
Sen. John McCain pictured on July 27, 2017. McCain returned to Washington after surgery for glioblastoma to cast a ‘no’ vote to a Republican-backed bill to repeal Obamacare. Cliff Owen/AP Photo

Glioblastoma topples an American hero, but researchers will continue the fight

John McCain was known as a tough fighter and patriot, refusing to yield to his captors' torture while he was imprisoned as a POW. In the end, cancer claimed him. Researchers say progress is coming.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in a Nov. 30, 2017 photo as he talked to small business owners about the tax bill. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

How the tax bill opens wide a big back door to overhaul health care

The Senate tax bill cuts taxes for many of the nation's richest and cuts programs for social safety nets. Here's how the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid are all affected.
The American people used to get more information in common. sirtravelalot/Shutterstock.com

Solving the political ad problem with transparency

Micro-targeted online advertising has destroyed how Americans share experiences and a common knowledge base. The fix for this societal and political problem is as simple now as it was in 1840.
U.S. President’s apparent passion for cruelty speaks to a greater American illness. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Donald Trump’s passion for cruelty

Donald Trump seems to have a passion for cruelty, often publicly celebrating his investment in violence as a source of pleasure. Those tendencies represent symptoms of a broader American sickness.
From left, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., hold a press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

How the latest effort to repeal Obamacare would affect millions

A Senate vote in July seemed to signal the end of efforts to kill the Affordable Care Act. With a Sept. 30 deadline looming, though, a new bill has real possibilities. Here's why that could be bad.

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