Articles sur SARS-CoV-2

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A researcher wearing a face mask and gloves as a preventive measure inside a laboratory. Chaiwat Subprasom/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Pressure is on to develop a COVID-19 vaccine, but corners can’t be cut

Vaccine development usually spans a number of decades. This is because there's a need to understand the mechanisms of protection against the pathogen, and to minimise adverse reactions.
COVID-19 has been linked to neurological problems in those with severe disease. Ralwel / Getty Images

Rare neurological disorder, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, linked to COVID-19

As if the symptoms of COVID-19 were not disturbing enough, physicians have noted a rare neurological condition that emerges during some severe cases of this viral infection.
Pooling samples means one test can screen multiple people. Tetra Images via Getty Images

Group testing for coronavirus – called pooled testing – could be the fastest and cheapest way to increase screening nationwide

Screening multiple samples with a single test gets more people diagnosed using fewer supplies. Two health policy researchers explain how it works and how it could help the US.
The U.S. as a whole is facing a huge surge in coronavirus cases, but the differences between states like New York and Florida are striking. Kena Betancur/1207979953 via Getty Images

The US isn’t in a second wave of coronavirus – the first wave never ended

The recent spike in new coronavirus cases in the US is not due to a second wave, but simply the virus moving into new populations or surging in places that opened up too soon.
SARS-CoV-2 turns on a cellular switch to build the tubes in this photo – called filopodia – that might help viral particles – the little spheres – spread more easily. Dr Elizabeth Fischer, NIAID NIH / Bouhaddou et al. Elsevier 2020

Coronavirus and cancer hijack the same parts in human cells to spread – and our team identified existing cancer drugs that could fight COVID-19

Kinases are cellular control switches. When they malfunction, they can cause cancer. The coronavirus hijacks these kinases to replicate, and cancer drugs that target them could fight COVID-19.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) shakes hands with French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian in Beijing on November 6, 2019. Also present is Élisabeth Borne, Minister of the Ecological and Inclusive Transition (left). Ludovic Marin/AFP

Covid-19: Lessons from China’s public diplomacy in the EU

China’s attempts to promote its actions and model of governance while discrediting the EU are not a short-term response to the pandemic, but part of a long-term strategy to build its international power.
Geoffrey McKillop (front) with his partner Nicola Dallet McConaghie as they left the hospital where he was discharged after surviving coronavirus. Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images

What doctors know about lingering symptoms of coronavirus

Is it possible that people who recover from COVID-19 will be plagued with long term side effects from the infection? An infectious disease physician reviews the evidence so far.
Doctors reported the first cases of MIS-C in April. Learning more about how SARS-CoV-2 affects children is essential to the safe reopening of communities. (Pexels/August de Richelieu)

Rare multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children linked to coronavirus

A rare new disease syndrome appears to be caused by an overactive immune response in children, often hitting weeks after exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
Screening for symptoms can catch some cases of COVID-19, but about people who are infected but not showing any symptoms? AP Photo/John Raoux

Can people spread the coronavirus if they don’t have symptoms? 5 questions answered about asymptomatic COVID-19

There is a lot of confusion and concern around asymptomatic spread of SARS-C0V-2. An infectious disease expert explains how many people are asymptomatic and how they can spread the virus.

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