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Articles on Citizenship

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Riyad Mahrez is one of several French born footballers currently playing for African countries. Shutterstock

How African diaspora footballers juggle the identity question

In football, a number of African teams draw heavily on their European-born diasporas, a reflection of a colonial past and deeply entrenched migration routes.
Rosa Gutierrez Lopez from El Salvador has been living in sanctuary in a church for a year due to a deportation order. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Why Latino citizens are worrying more about deportation

About 48% of Latino US citizens fear deportation for themselves, their loved ones or their communities. That's up from 41% in 2007.
Refugees at the Central Methodist Church in Cape Town, South Africa. Getty Images/Jacques Stander/Gallo Images via Getty Images

South Africa takes fresh steps to restrict rights of refugees

Refugee legislation introduced after the end of apartheid was lauded as being progressive. But implementation has fallen short of international standards.
A university class included a game that simulated aspects of the experience people like these would-be immigrants can expect in the U.S. AP Photo/Elliot Spagat

Learn to trust immigrants by role-playing in their shoes

Simulating some experiences of immigrant life can help nonimmigrants learn to understand, and even trust, people from other countries more.
Some people are U.S. citizens at birth, like this baby born in California. Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock.com

Who is born a US citizen?

If upheld, a federal court ruling would solidify birthright citizenship as the law of the land, and overturn more than a century of federal refusal to grant American Samoans citizenship status.
Protests have engulfed Assam since the National Register of Citizens was published in August 2019. They have intensified since the Citizenship Amendment Act was passed by the parliament. Central security forces, pictured here, have been sent in to repress the spontaneous protests by different citizens groups. (Arunabh Saikia)

New laws weaponize citizenship in India

India has been working to expel or repress Muslim minorities. Nearly two million residents of India’s eastern state of Assam are at risk of losing citizenship.
Activists and local volunteers meet and console Assamese villagers who might have lost their Indian citizenship. Anuradha Sen Mookerjee

In India’s Assam, a solidarity network has emerged to help those at risk of becoming stateless

As new citizenship law will further discriminate against people on religious basis in India's north-eastern Assam, local activists are uniting across the region to help distressed residents.
A narrow river divides Myanmar from Bangladesh, where nearly 1 million now live as refugees. AP Photo/Bernat Armangue

Myanmar charged with genocide of Rohingya Muslims: 5 essential reads

Dozens of Muslim-majority countries are asking the UN's International Criminal Court to investigate and prosecute a 2017 massacre in Myanmar that killed an estimated 10,000 Rohingya Muslims.
All voting-age Indians may soon be asked to submit government-issued ID to prove citizenship. That may be a challenge for women, religious minorities and members of oppressed castes. AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh

India’s plan to identify ‘illegal immigrants’ could get some Muslims declared ‘foreign’

Many women, Muslims and members of oppressed castes in India lack government-issued ID. Yet these documents may soon be required to prove their citizenship.

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