Australian Film, Television and Radio School

The Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS) is Australia’s national screen arts and broadcast school . The school is an Australian Commonwealth government statutory authority. It is a member of the “Australian Roundtable for Arts Training Excellence”.

AFTRS focus is to advance the success of Australia’s screen arts and broadcast industries by developing the skills and knowledge of talented individuals and undertaking research.

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Harvey Keitel in Reservoir Dogs (1992). Live Entertainment

Explainer: the rules for shooting on film sets

The death of a stuntman while filming a music video in Brisbane has thrown a spotlight on film set safety. Licensed armourers follow strict safety procedures while filming - but firing blanks can still be dangerous.
Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, Disney Studios Vice President Mary Ann Hughes and Screen Queensland CEO Tracey Vieira pose at Village Roadshow Studios on the Gold Coast last week. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Call the specialists: what Thor and Aliens could really do for the Australian film industry

For every film, specialists are employed for everything from rigging the lights executing the stunts. The announcement of two major new productions coming to Australia will develop that expertise.
The niche television market is now the place to be. Fred Mantel/www.shutterstock.com

New rules for a new generation of television producers

Mass media is on its way out, and the pursuit and influence of niche audiences has fundamentally reshaped everything from the music industry to publishing. Now it's reshaping television.
New research shows that not all illegal downloaders are created equally. Lee Nachtigal

Anxious addict or conscious cowboy? A new view on illegal downloading

Beginning about 20 years ago, the internet placed almost the entirety of human creation in an unguarded window display and said, in effect, help yourself. But that's not to say all illegal downloaders are the same.
Should the offset for screen producers apply to all films made in Australia? Yes, even the ones that ruffle a few feathers. mark sebastian/Flickr

Australian film funding shouldn’t be a beauty contest – here’s why

The producers of a creationist doc took advantage of Screen Australia's tax offsets. Were they exploiting a loophole? Hardly – and there's good reason why producers of all films should enjoy such benefits.
Director Greg McLean and John Jarratt on-set shooting Wolf Creek 2. AAP Image/Cameron Oliver

Making films is never easy but we can fix the local industry

We know the transformation of global media technologies pose particular challenges to local filmmakers – and that the rewards are still slim. But there are good reasons to be optimistic about the future of the industry.
Australian producers are struggling to face challenges imposed by a changing screen industry – and greater transparency will benefit everyone. AAP Image/Gaye Gerard

How Australian filmmakers can benefit from sharing information

There is an emerging push for greater transparency in the industry about how films are funded and the profits they return. But can sharing information can help a financially risky industry into the black?
Creativity ‘does not somehow float free of economic gravity, miraculously aloft’. Fabio Zenoardo

Creativity might be playful – but it’s also work

The view that art is essentially unworldly and creativity is play has a long history, dating back to the Romantics in the 18th century. According to this view, art must be kept separate from money, lest…
A film industry is an ecosystem and needs all its parts. Village Roadshow

The Lego Movie builds the case for Australian know-how

The Lego Movie was released to a legion of fans in the US last Friday and massive box office success. So what do a Hollywood movie and a Danish toy company have to do with Australia? Well, quite a lot…

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