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CSIRO is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research organisations in the world. We focus on creating a positive impact and on answering the big questions for industry and society.

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Coal emissions are falling, but gas and coal use are strongly rising around the world. EPA/SASCHA STEINBACH

Global emissions to hit 36.8 billion tonnes, beating last year’s record high

Carbon emissions will hit a record high for the second year in a row, but there is a small silver lining: the rate of emissions growth has slowed dramatically.
Aerial imagery revealing the extent of storm damage in Dee Why on Sydney’s Northern Beaches in 2016 following wild weather. NEARMAP/AAP

A landmark report confirms Australia is girt by hotter, higher seas. But there’s still time to act

The IPCC report says extreme sea level events that used to hit once a century will occur once a year in many places by 2050. This situation is inevitable, even if emissions are dramatically curbed.
Very rarely, depending on where you are in the world, your compass can actually point to true north. https://www.shutterstock.com

Explainer: what happens when magnetic north and true north align?

Recently, magnetic compasses at Greenwich pointed directly at true north for the first time in 360 years. This is currently happening in Western Australia too. But what does it mean?
A view from CSIRO’s Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope antenna 29, with the phased array feed receiver in the centre, Southern Cross on the left and the Moon on the right. CSIRO/Alex Cherney

How we closed in on the location of a fast radio burst in a galaxy far, far away

For the first time scientists have located the home galaxy of a one-off fast radio burst. Here's how they did it – and what they learned about the galaxy.
Most new houses being built in Australia do no better than comply with the minimum energy performance required by regulations. Brendon Esposito/AAP

Australia’s still building 4 in every 5 new houses to no more than the minimum energy standard

Australia requires a minimum six-star energy rating for new housing. New homes average just 6.2 stars, so builders are doing the bare minimum to comply, even as the costs of this approach are rising.
Australia’s future prosperity will require bold action on a number of fronts and a deliberate commitment to careful and considered long-term thinking. Hendra Pontomudis / unsplash

It’s time for Australia to commit to the kind of future it wants: CSIRO Australian National Outlook 2019

If the right changes are made today, Australia’s living standards could be up to 36% higher in 2060. This translates into a 90% increase in average wages (in adjusted, real terms) from today.

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