CSIRO

CSIRO is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research organisations in the world. We focus on creating a positive impact and on answering the big questions for industry and society.

Links

Displaying 21 - 40 of 578 articles

AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Carbon emissions will reach 37 billion tonnes in 2018, a record high

For the second year in a row global greenhouse emissions from fossil fuels have risen, putting 2018 on course to set a new record, according to an annual audit from the Global Carbon Project.
A number of initiatives for Australian women in STEM got off the ground in 2018. Tim Gouw/unsplash

New awards, new ambassador: Australian women in STEM look to 2019

The Athena Swan charter commits research institutions to create a gender inclusive workplace, through taking action and being held accountable. 15 Australian institutions are now bronze awardees.
Signs of life on Mars? These are the tracks of NASA’s Curiosity rover exploring the Martian landscape. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Our long fascination with the journey to Mars

Mars has long captured our imagination, from claims of canals to Martian attacks and now our latest NASA exploration to look inside the red planet.
If you went to Mars, you’d need to be able to survive an extremely punishing environment. This picture, taken by NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, gives you an idea. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

Curious Kids: What are some of the challenges to Mars travel?

I've worked with NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Project for 16 years. If you got yourself a ticket to Mars, here's how I'd advise you to prepare. And by the way, any mistake could kill you.
In fact, it’s not even the moths eating your clothes. Flickr/Vlad Proklov

Curious Kids: How do moths eat our clothes?

If you see moths and their larvae near your clothes, it's a sign that it's time to wash all your clothes and air them out in the sun.
Plastic bags, balloons, and rope fragments were among more than 100 pieces of plastic in the gut of a single turtle. Qamar Schuyler

How much plastic does it take to kill a turtle? Typically just 14 pieces

Autopsies of 1,000 turtles washed up on Australian beaches paint a grim picture of the impact of plastic debris. Even a single piece can be deadly, and on average 14 pieces equals a 50% fatality rate.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors