Fundação Getúlio Vargas

Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV), founded in 1944, is a world renowned center for quality education dedicated to promoting Brazil’s economic and social development. With eight schools, two research institutes, technical assistance projects and a publishing unit, FGV is ranked one of the top think tanks and top higher education institutions in the world.

FGV produces a large amount of academic research. The subjects cover macro and micro-economics, finance, business, decision-making, law, health, welfare, poverty and unemployment, pollution, and sustainable development. The foundation also maintains research programs in the fields of History, Social Sciences, Education, Justice, Citizenship, and Politics. FGV also executes projects at the request of the public sector, private enterprise and international agencies such as the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Notable examples of such work include assistance for the successful Rio de Janeiro bids for the 2007 Pan American Games and the 2016 Summer Olympics.

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Bricks, laid out in front of Congress, represent the staggering number of Brazilians killed each week. Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters

Brazil’s biggest problem isn’t corruption — it’s murder

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Les dirigeants du Brésil, de la Russie, d'Inde, de la Chine et d'Afrique du Sud (de gauche à droite). Money Sharma/Flickr

L’importance des BRICS ne se dément pas

Le 8ᵉ sommet des BRICS qui a eu lieu à Goa les 15 et 16 octobre montre que cette coalition est toujours d’actualité et plus active que jamais.
Brazil’s President Michel Temer, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Chinese President Xi Jinping and South African President Jacob Zuma. Danish Siddiqui/Reuters

Why the BRICS coalition still matters

Despite financial crises and political differences among these five emerging economies, the BRICS coalition is here to stay. And it may just change the world.

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