Grattan Institute

Grattan Institute aspires to contribute to public policy in Australia as a liberal democracy in a globalised economy. Our work is objective, evidence-driven and non-aligned. We foster informed public debate on the key issues for Australia through both public events and private forums engaging key decision makers and the broader community.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 223 articles

Political calculations drove the Abbott and Baird governments’ decisions on investing taxpayers’ money in the WestConnex project. Nikki Short/AAP

WestConnex audit offers another $17b lesson in how not to fund infrastructure

Reckless government investment decisions are sadly the norm when it comes to transport infrastructure. Three key checks on the decision-making process can help ensure taxpayers get value for money.
The latest snapshot of Australian health funding reveals who’s footing the bill, among other worrying health statistics. from www.shutterstock.com

Sobering health stats in latest Productivity Commission report

The latest Productivity Commission health report reveals some serious problems with out-of-pocket health expenses as well as disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health.
MYEFO is more positive about the 2016-17 budget bottom line than previous expectations. However, projections over the forward estimates have worsened. Lukas Coch/AAP

2016-17 MYEFO experts’ response: more of the same is not good enough

While MYEFO discussion focuses on the budget deficit, experts say it also serves as a stark reminder of the need for bigger policy ideas in Canberra.
A tax on sugary drinks wouldn’t just prevent obesity, it could recoup some of the costs from obesity to the taxpayer. from www.shutterstock.com.au

A sugary drinks tax could recoup some of the costs of obesity while preventing it

Obesity imposes enormous costs on the community, through higher taxes to fund extra government spending on health and from foregone tax revenue because obese people are more likely to be unemployed.
Many seniors pay less than younger workers on the same income as a result of special tax breaks for seniors. www.shutterstock.com

Why special tax breaks for seniors should go

The federal government could save about A$1 billion a year by changing three unfair tax breaks for older Australians, a new report says.

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