Harvard University

Harvard University is devoted to excellence in teaching, learning, and research, and to developing leaders in many disciplines who make a difference globally. Harvard faculty are engaged with teaching and research to push the boundaries of human knowledge. For students who are excited to investigate the biggest issues of the 21st century, Harvard offers an unparalleled student experience and a generous financial aid program, with over $160 million awarded to more than 60% of our undergraduate students. The University has twelve degree-granting Schools in addition to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, offering a truly global education.

Established in 1636, Harvard is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States. The University, which is based in Cambridge and Boston, Massachusetts, has an enrollment of over 20,000 degree candidates, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Harvard has more than 360,000 alumni around the world.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 282 articles

Roberto Clemente State Park employees in New York, with donated bottled water bottles bound for Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. AP Photo/Julie Jacobson

Want to help after hurricanes? Give cash, not diapers

If you would like to assist from afar, let the professionals procure goods and services.
Street in Hangzhou, China, with trees separating a cycle track from road traffic and from the sidewalk. Xu Wen

Designing greener streets starts with finding room for bicycles and trees

Many US cities are investing in bike infrastructure and shade trees. Properly located, these additions can make streets cooler, cleaner and safer for all users – even those who drive.
Governments can use nudges to influence our choices. Shutterstock

Speaking with: law professor Cass Sunstein, on why behavioural science is always nudging us

Law professor Cass Sunstein, on why behavioural science is always nudging us. The Conversation20.5 MB (download)
Governments and businesses are using "nudges" to influence our choices, but how? On this podcast episode, Cass Sunstein, a Harvard professor who wrote the book on nudges, unpacks behavioural science.
El cerebro, ese enigma. ra2studio/www.shutterstock.com

¿Por qué nuestro cerebro siempre encuentra problemas?

¿Por qué en la vida se nos presentan tantos problemas que parecen aferrarse a nosotros con tal fuerza que no importa lo que hagamos para resolverlos? La psicología habla de "deslizamiento de concepto".
¿Cómo puede alguien saber si está progresando en la resolución de un problema, si el cerebro humano está diseñado para continuamente redefinir las condiciones de esa resolución? ra2studio/www.shutterstock.com

¿Por qué nuestro cerebro siempre encuentra problemas?

Cuando algo se vuelve raro, la gente puede percibirlo en más lugares. ¿Qué es en psicología el "concepto progresivo" que hace que cambiemos la forma en que categorizamos el mundo que nos rodea?
Birds don’t fly across wide Amazonian rivers like the Rio Negro. Marcos Amend www.marcosamend.com (for use with this article only)

Bird DNA helps explain Amazonian rivers’ role in evolution

Rivers are natural boundaries for evolving populations. But scientists don't agree whether they create new species or just help maintain them. Research using birds' molecular clocks provides some answers.
Why do people constantly ‘move the goalposts’ when making judgments? JoeNattapon/Shutterstock.com

Why your brain never runs out of problems to find

It's a psychological quirk that when something becomes rarer, people may spot it in more places than ever. What is the 'concept creep' that lets context change how we categorize the world around us?
Tighter emissions standards create costs for truck manufacturers yet provide health benefits for society. How should they be weighed? Lesterman

Why a minor change to how EPA makes rules could radically reduce environmental protection

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has proposed steps that would reduce economic benefits to society from new regulations. An economist who worked for Presidents Clinton and Obama calls this a strategy to justify deregulation.
Members of a ‘particular social group’ may qualify for asylum if they have suffered violence for such traits as gender, sexual identity and sexual orientation. AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal

Why domestic abuse and anti-gay violence qualify as persecution in asylum law

International law recognizes that women and LGBTQ people face unique forms of violence that may qualify them for asylum. The US now asserts that domestic abuse is a 'private' matter.
A large dust storm, or haboob, sweeps across downtown Phoenix on July 21, 2012. AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File

Increased deaths and illnesses from inhaling airborne dust: An understudied impact of climate change

New research projects that climate change could greatly increase airborne dust levels in the southwestern US, causing higher hospital admissions and premature deaths from heart and lung ailments.

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