Harvard University

Harvard University is devoted to excellence in teaching, learning, and research, and to developing leaders in many disciplines who make a difference globally. Harvard faculty are engaged with teaching and research to push the boundaries of human knowledge. For students who are excited to investigate the biggest issues of the 21st century, Harvard offers an unparalleled student experience and a generous financial aid program, with over $160 million awarded to more than 60% of our undergraduate students. The University has twelve degree-granting Schools in addition to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, offering a truly global education.

Established in 1636, Harvard is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States. The University, which is based in Cambridge and Boston, Massachusetts, has an enrollment of over 20,000 degree candidates, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. Harvard has more than 360,000 alumni around the world.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 328 articles

Tarana Burke created #MeToo in 2006 but it didn’t emerge as a mass social movement until 2017. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

Why social movements like #MeToo seem to come out of nowhere

From the French Revolution to #MeToo, social movements often burst into the mainstream with what seems like little warning. Cass Sunstein explains why.
La science fait partie de la vie quotidienne. Beaucoup d'informations circulent, et disent un fait et son contraire. La démarche journalistique est d'autant plus nécessaire. Shutterstock

Avenir du journalisme scientifique : il y a de l’espoir!

La science fait partie de la vie quotidienne. Les informations circulent et disent un fait et son contraire. Les journalistes doivent tenir compte de toutes les ambiguïtés d'un sujet.
Our decision-making and conduct is influenced by what we read, see or hear. (Shutterstock)

Why we see hope for the future of science journalism

Science is a part of everyday life. Science journalists can do more to connect science to the public.
Assembling capacitors for electric automobiles at SBE, Inc. in Barre, Vermont, July 16, 2010. SBE received a $9 million stimulus grant to build electric drive components. AP Photo/Toby Talbot

What Green New Deal advocates can learn from the 2009 economic stimulus act

An Obama administration veteran offers some insights from his experience about driving massive increases in clean energy.
In 1919, 1,376 new Norway Maples were planted along streets in Brooklyn. Department of Parks of the Borough of Brooklyn, City of New York

Not so long ago, cities were starved for trees

In 1910, along one 45-block stretch of New York City's Fifth Avenue, there were only 13 trees.
Could a random admissions process help spare universities from legal trouble and save time and money? Adam Alagna/www.shutterstock.com

Why elite colleges should use a lottery to admit students

Colleges and universities are often criticized for how they admit students from diverse groups. A college admissions scholar suggests an admissions lottery could help make the process more fair.
Heads of delegations react at the end of the final session of the COP24 summit on climate change in Katowice, Poland, Saturday, Dec. 15, 2018. AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski

An economist’s take on the Poland climate conference: The glass is more than half full

An economist breaks down results on two key issues at the COP24 climate change meeting: getting all nations to use the same measuring and reporting rules, and linking policies across borders.
Devastation from Hurricane Michael in Mexico Beach, Florida, Oct. 12, 2018. Residents whose homes have suffered major damage in multiple storms could eventually be offered buyouts, but the process can take several years. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Government-funded buyouts after disasters are slow and inequitable – here’s how that could change

Government agencies spend millions of dollars yearly to buy and demolish homes sited in floodplains. But the program is slow, cumbersome and doesn't always help those who need it most.
Roberto Clemente State Park employees in New York, with donated bottled water bottles bound for Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. AP Photo/Julie Jacobson

Want to help after hurricanes? Give cash, not diapers

If you would like to assist from afar, let the professionals procure goods and services.
Street in Hangzhou, China, with trees separating a cycle track from road traffic and from the sidewalk. Xu Wen

Designing greener streets starts with finding room for bicycles and trees

Many US cities are investing in bike infrastructure and shade trees. Properly located, these additions can make streets cooler, cleaner and safer for all users – even those who drive.
Governments can use nudges to influence our choices. Shutterstock

Speaking with: law professor Cass Sunstein, on why behavioural science is always nudging us

Law professor Cass Sunstein, on why behavioural science is always nudging us. The Conversation20.5 MB (download)
Governments and businesses are using "nudges" to influence our choices, but how? On this podcast episode, Cass Sunstein, a Harvard professor who wrote the book on nudges, unpacks behavioural science.

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