London School of Economics and Political Science

The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) studies the social sciences in their broadest sense, with an academic profile spanning a wide range of disciplines, from economics, politics and law, to sociology, information systems and accounting and finance.

Founded in 1895 by Beatrice and Sidney Webb, the School has an outstanding reputation for academic excellence and is one of the most international universities in the world. Its study of social, economic and political problems focuses on the different perspectives and experiences of most countries. From its foundation LSE has aimed to be a laboratory of the social sciences, a place where ideas are developed, analysed, evaluated and disseminated around the globe. To date, 16 Nobel prize winners have been LSE staff or alumni and 34 past or present world leaders have studied or taught at LSE.


Displaying 1 - 20 of 162 articles

Around 1.3 million households receive government rent assistance. Nils Versemann/Shutterstock

Housing: the hidden health intervention

The effects of unaffordable housing cascade into other areas of life, in particular, affecting mental health.
Shifts in our communication infrastructures have reshaped the very possibilities of social order driven by markets and commercial exploitation. Marc Smith/flickr

The price of connection: ‘surveillance capitalism’

Capitalism has become focused on expanding the proportion of social life that is open to data collection and processing – as if the social itself has become the new target of capitalism’s expansion.

How universities boost economic growth

The second half of the 20th century saw explosive economic growth and also a huge increase in universities – new research shows the two are related.
Athletes seek to gain competitive advantages in lots of different ways and many of these are not banned. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Why is doping wrong anyway?

Doping simply gives athletes an advantage that can be compared to other forms of training regimes. So why the moral outrage?
The act of taking a census is as old as civilisation itself. AAP/Dean Lewins

Explainer: what is the census, and why does it matter?

Census data have a real impact on the lives of Australians, from determining political representation through the distribution of electorates, to the allocation of government funding.

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