The Ohio State University

Founded in 1870, The Ohio State University is one of the world’s most comprehensive public research universities. Consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top 20 public universities, Ohio State is a research powerhouse, with a wide-ranging network of expertise on a single campus. The Columbus campus is home to more than 300 collaborative research centers and 15 colleges, including seven in the health sciences and colleges of agriculture and engineering.

The breadth, depth and excellence of our interdisciplinary research programs make Ohio State a leading force of innovation and change – locally, nationally and globally. With nearly a billion dollars in research expenditures annually, the university is a world-class innovator in critical areas such as climate change, cancer, infectious diseases, advanced materials and ag-bio products.

In Ohio, more than 64,000 students, from all 50 states and 110 countries, pursue their personal career aspirations at our five campuses. Ohio State’s Alumni Association is one of the oldest in the nation, with more than 500,000 alumni living around the world. Three Global Gateway campuses—in China, Brazil and India—make Ohio State a truly international university.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 168 articles

Social smoking is just as bad on your heart as regular smoking, a new study suggests. California Department of Health Services

Why social smoking can be just as bad for you as daily smoking

About one in 10 Americans say they sometimes smoke, often in social settings. Many think it's not so bad for them. A new study has some scary findings, when it comes to matters of the heart.
Members of Patriotic Millionaires, whose privileged members advocate for higher taxes on the rich, met with lawmakers in this 2015 photo to discuss legislation to close the carried interest loophole. Senate Democrats

How some rich people are trying to dismantle inequality

When the wealthy become unlikely allies in the fight against inequality, they often take similar steps. It all starts with acknowledging their own privileges.
Fed Chair Janet Yellen heads one of the most powerful financial institutions in the world. Reuters/Carlos Barria

How Trump’s nominee for the Fed could turn central banking on its head

Randal Quarles, the president's first nominee to the Federal Reserve's board of governors, has argued the bank should use rules to make decisions. But could such a shift prove disastrous in a crisis?
Ohio is fighting to hold drug companies accountable for their role in the opioid epidemic. Bryan Woolston/Reuters

A look inside Ohio’s lawsuit against opioid manufacturers

The state of Ohio filed a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers. Will their legal arguments hold up in court – and what will it mean for other cities and states going after big pharma?
Ella Russell, a second grade student at Jamestown Elementary School in Arlington, Virginia, works on an e-book during class. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Textbooks in the digital world

Textbooks were once a major piece of educational infrastructure. But as digital content expands, a new kind of 'textbook' is improving the quality of K-12 instruction.
Social media can lead to comparisons, which often can be depressing, a study finds. Africa Studios via www.shutterstock.cm

Why Facebook may fuel new mothers’ insecurity

Social media seem like a great way for new mothers to connect, but there are times when it's depressing. Here are some reasons new mothers may want to walk away from Facebook and connect in person.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin offers details of his boss’ proposed tax cut. ‘It’s big.’ Carolyn Kaster/AP Photo

Would Trump’s tax cut be the biggest ever? Fat chance

The bar for achieving that lofty goal was set almost 150 years ago when Congress cut taxes from as high as 10 percent to zero over two years.
Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan are giving billions to charity through their donor-advised fund instead of a traditional foundation. Jeff Chiu/AP Photo

Donor-advised funds: Charities with benefits

As these tax-exempt vehicles transform philanthropy, they’re drawing more scrutiny. Will Congress or the Trump administration tinker with the rules that encouraged their rapid growth?

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