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The Ohio State University

Founded in 1870, The Ohio State University is one of the world’s most comprehensive public research universities. Consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top 20 public universities, Ohio State is a research powerhouse, with a wide-ranging network of expertise on a single campus. The Columbus campus is home to more than 300 collaborative research centers and 15 colleges, including seven in the health sciences and colleges of agriculture and engineering.

The breadth, depth and excellence of our interdisciplinary research programs make Ohio State a leading force of innovation and change – locally, nationally and globally. With nearly a billion dollars in research expenditures annually, the university is a world-class innovator in critical areas such as climate change, cancer, infectious diseases, advanced materials and ag-bio products.

In Ohio, more than 64,000 students, from all 50 states and 110 countries, pursue their personal career aspirations at our five campuses. Ohio State’s Alumni Association is one of the oldest in the nation, with more than 500,000 alumni living around the world. Three Global Gateway campuses—in China, Brazil and India—make Ohio State a truly international university.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 301 articles

Richard Nixon, celebrating his election on Nov. 7, 1968, campaigned against a backdrop of racial inequality, civic unrest and polarized politics. AFP via Getty Images

1968’s presidential election looks a lot like today’s – but it was very different

There are similarities between the law-and-order language used by the 1968 and 2020 presidential candidates and the racial tension and political polarization both years. But much is different.
Encouraging students at the University of Colorado, Boulder, to vote in the midterm elections, Nov. 6, 2018. Jason Connolly/AFP via Getty Images

Want the youth vote? Some college students are still up for grabs in November

Researchers examined the voting behavior of 5,762 students at 120 colleges and universities. Two groups stood out as an untapped electoral resource – if the candidates can turn out Gen Z.
The global pandemic has interrupted supply chains for almost 75% of US companies. Thatree Thitivongvaroon/Getty Images

The pandemic has revealed the cracks in US manufacturing: Here’s how to fix them

Medical supply shortages during the pandemic revealed that US industries are unable to provide essential goods in a crisis. A return to domestic production would boost incomes and prepare us for the next crisis.
Wedding gown bodice, circa 1836. The Ohio State Historic Costume & Textiles Collection

Why do brides wear white?

The tradition of a bride garbed in white weaves through two thousand years of history, influenced by the Romans – and Queen Victoria.
Ice core analysis can help us better understand historical ‘black swan’ events like pandemics and droughts. The Washington Post via Getty Images

Video: How ancient ice cores show ‘black swan’ events in history – even pandemics

Ice cores can preserve evidence of 'black swan' events like pandemics and droughts, but the glaciers from which they are collected are disappearing.
Des fermiers zapotèques reviennent de leur « milpa ». Ces parcelles de jardin fournissent une grande partie de la nourriture des communautés, à Oaxaca, au Mexique. Jeffrey H. Cohen

Au Mexique, une communauté indigène se coupe du monde pour échapper au Covid-19

Les Zapotèques du sud du Mexique, communauté qui se caractérise par une forte solidarité interne, ont décidé de pratiquement se couper du monde pour échapper à l’épidémie.
The Rev. Philip Dinwiddie sings to a pre-recording of mass at St. James Episcopal Church in Grosse Ile, Michigan. Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

How the sound of religion has changed in the pandemic

A team of scholars have been documenting the sound of worship for six years. Since the lockdown, they have heard a different form of religious expression.
A demonstrator heads to an anti-violence protest in Chicago, which has struggled with gun violence for decades, July 7, 2018. Jim Young/AFP via Getty Images)

Faith-based ‘violence interrupters’ stop gang shootings with promise of redemption for at-risk youth – not threats of jail

Gun violence has killed hundreds of Americans, including kids, this summer. There are proven ways to bring peace to city streets, says an expert in violence prevention – but someone has to pay for it.

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