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University of Massachusetts

The University of Massachusetts is a world-class public research university committed to advancing knowledge and transforming lives. Through its world-class educational programs, groundbreaking research enterprise and its impactful community service and industry engagement activities, UMass harnesses the revolutionary spirit of Massachusetts to deliver an unparalleled student experience.

With four comprehensive undergraduate and graduate campuses, a top-ranked medical school and a mission-driven law school, each campus offers a dynamic educational experience in a uniquely Massachusetts location, from the coastal town of Dartmouth to the international hub of Boston, from the vibrant mill cities of Lowell and Worcester to the bucolic hills of Amherst. Rigorous academic programs in a broad range of fields prepare students to contribute to their communities, thrive in a new economy and change the world.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 153 articles

People look at the remains of an exploded vehicle that the Islamic State used as a suicide bomb, on display in Iran in September 2020. Morteza Nikoubazl/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Who really defeated the Islamic State – Obama or Trump?

President Trump has claimed the Islamic State was completely defeated on his watch – but an analysis of government maps and other reports shows his administration did only half the work.
A black hole is an object so compact that nothing can escape its gravitational pull, not even light. They are formed when stars die and start collapsing under their own weight. Deep inside the black hole resides an infinitely hot and dense object, a so-called, singularity. Science Photo Library - MARK GARLICK/Getty Images

2020 Nobel Prize in physics awarded for work on black holes – an astrophysicist explains the trailblazing discoveries

The 2020 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to three scientists – an Englishman, an American and a German – for breakthroughs in understanding the most mysterious objects in the universe: black holes.
People gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court building as news spread of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Sept. 18 death. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

3 ways a 6-3 Supreme Court would be different

A 6-3 conservative court will hear a broader range of controversial cases, shift interpretations of individual rights and put more pressure on local democracy to make policy decisions.
A Guatemalan immigrant tries to log on to his Chromebook while remote learning in Stamford, Connecticut. John Moore/Getty Images

For many immigrant students, remote learning during COVID-19 comes with more hurdles

Immigrant students often have work commitments outside class, and they may need additional language support. Giving them equal access to technology during remote learning might not be enough.
Sending in the feds to quell unrest often increases conflict on the ground, as it did this summer in Portland, Ore. Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Federal agents sent to Kenosha, but history shows militarized policing in cities can escalate violence and trigger conflict

Kenosha is the latest US city to see federal agents patrolling its protests. History suggests that supplanting the local police with a militarized national force rarely works out well.
Voters in Nashville, Tennessee, faced long lines in March 2020. AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

The right to vote is not in the Constitution

The framers of the Constitution never mentioned a right to vote. They didn't forget. They intentionally left it out.
On Dec. 19, 2016, Colorado elector Micheal Baca, in T-shirt second from left, cast his electoral ballot for John Kasich, though Hillary Clinton had won his state’s popular vote. AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Supreme Court reforms, strengthens Electoral College

Electors may not vote their consciences, which means the Electoral College will continue to operate how most Americans think it does.
When blocking a highway, who is a domestic terrorist and who is a peaceful protester? And does it make a legal difference? David Ryder/Getty Images

The ‘domestic terrorist’ designation won’t stop extremism

Legally designating domestic extremist groups as terrorist organizations – as some in the US advocate now – will have limited benefits, if any at all.
Protesters hold signs outside women’s fashion designer Eudon Choi in London during Fashion Week in 2017. Elena Rostenova/www.shutterstock.com

Python skin jackets and elephant leather boots: How wealthy Western nations help drive the global wildlife trade

The COVID-19 pandemic has cast a harsh light on global commerce in wildlife. But many accounts focus on demand from Asia, ignoring the role of US and European consumers.
On Dec. 19, 2016, Colorado elector Micheal Baca, in T-shirt second from left, cast his electoral ballot for John Kasich, though Hillary Clinton had won his state’s popular vote. AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Supreme Court to decide the future of the Electoral College

Many Americans are surprised to learn that Electoral College members do not necessarily have to pick the candidate their state's voters favored. Or do they?
Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser presenting via telephone during oral argument before the Supreme Court on May 13, 2020 in Denver, Colorado. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Supreme Court phoning it in means better arguments, more public engagement

The Supreme Court's pandemic-related move to oral argument over the telephone has improved those arguments and allowed the public to engage with these discussions of the meaning of our Constitution.

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