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Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute is Australia’s oldest medical research institute, founded in 1915.

The Institute has more than 850 researchers who are working to understand, prevent and treat diseases including: cancers such as breast, blood and bowel cancers; immune disorders such as diabetes, coeliac disease and multiple sclerosis; and infectious diseases including malaria, hepatitis B and HIV.

Our affiliation with The Royal Melbourne Hospital links research outcomes with clinical practice to accelerate discoveries for health and disease. We offer postgraduate training as the Department of Medical Biology of The University of Melbourne.

More than 30 million people worldwide have been helped by discoveries made at the Institute and more than 100 national and international clinical trials are underway that originate from Institute research. This include trials of vaccines and therapies for type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease and malaria; trials of new anti-inflammatory agents for arthritis and other immune disorders; and trials of a new class of anti-cancer drugs, called BH3-mimetics, for treating patients with leukaemia and other cancers.

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Tracking mosquitoes in our backyards, such as Aedes notoscriptus, helps authorities work out future health risks. Cameron Webb (NSW Health Pathology)

This mosquito species from Papua New Guinea was lost for 90 years – until a photographer snapped a picture of it in Australia

Tracking mosquitoes is essential to understanding their pest and public health risks. You can help too – here’s how.
Are you exhausted? Your immune cells might be too. from www.shutterstock.com

Five life lessons from your immune system

The cornerstone of our adaptive immune system is the ability to remember the various infections we have encountered. Quite literally, if it doesn’t kill you, it makes your immune system stronger.
Even without drugs, nets or an understanding of what caused malaria, human bodies were still fighting against the parasite – and winning. from shutterstock.com

How our red blood cells keep evolving to fight malaria

Today, human populations carry heavy genetic marks from the war with malaria. And it is the red blood cell (erythrocyte) that mostly bears the scars.
Liquid biopsy is less invasive than standard biopsy, where a needle is put into a solid tumour to confirm a cancer diagnosis. Shutterstock

A new blood test can detect eight different cancers in their early stages

There are currently few effective and non-invasive methods to screen for early stages of cancer. But scientists have now developed a new blood test that promises to detect eight different cancers.

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