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Lecturer in History, Arizona State University

Ph. D. In American History, University of Virginia, graduated May 2014. Dissertation title: “‘The Fortunes of War’: Confederate Expansionist Ambitions during the American Civil War”

Publications and Other Projects: Forthcoming: “1864: The Genesis of a New Tory World?” in Jeremy Black, ed. The Tory World: A Deep History and the Tory Theme in British Foreign Policy (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014); Under Peer Review (Civil War History): “The Imperial Throne of Southern Commerce is now Vacant for our Possession,” The Ambitions of George Wythe Randolph between 1851 and 1867. “The Enduring Importance of Foreign Policy Dominance in Mid Nineteenth Century Politics” in Mulligan and Simms, eds., The Primacy of Foreign Policy in British History: How Strategic Concerns Shaped Modern Britain, 1660-2000 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010)

Personal statement: Instructor, “American Reactions to the First Age of Globalization, c1848-c1870.” My work in public history has included an internship at the George C. Marshall Foundation in Lexington, Virginia (2011), gave inaugural talk for the Foundation’s Night at the Archives Series “Resolving Dilemmas, how George C. Marshall Successfully Reconciled his Personal and Professional Lives in Pursuit of Excellence.” Early in 2012, I addressed the Charlottesville-Albermarle County Civil War Round Table on Anglo-French reactions to the Confederate military revival in 1862, “From the Gates of Richmond to Antietam Creek: the Civil War’s International Interlude.” In 2013, I gave a talk to the same organization, “The Imperial Throne of Southern Commerce is Now Vacant for our Possession”: George Wythe Randolph, Jefferson, Virginia and the Confederacy.

Specialties: United States Civil War history; United States nineteenth century political history and diplomatic history; British nineteenth century political and diplomatic history; the nineteenth century Atlantic world; nineteenth century empire and globalization

Experience

  • –present
    Lecturer in History, Arizona State University