Professor of Unconventional Petroleum, Durham University

I am a primarily a petroleum geoscientist with a particular interest in shales and mudstones. After PhD and postdoctoral research in marine and isotope geochemistry, I spent several years with BP and many at Newcastle University, before joining the department in 2013. With students and RAs, I have worked on many problems linked to the physical and chemical properties of fine-grained sediments, including seals to petroleum reservoirs and CO2 storage sites, leakage, gas shales, and pore pressure estimation. Aiming to apply high quality science to help answer industrially and societally important questions, much of my work has an industrial context and involves collaboration with a diverse range of earth and other physical scientists. I have been involved with and led several, major Joint Industry Projects, have published over 70 peer-reviewed papers and was awarded the Wallace E. Pratt Memorial Award for Best Paper in AAPG Bulletin in both 2009 and 2013.

My interests are mainly rooted in petroleum geoscience, although I also have a background in environmental geochemistry. My work focusses especially on fine-grained sediments, including seals to petroleum reservoir and CO2 storage sites, gas/oil shales, fluid flow including leakage and migration.

Experience

  • –present
    Professor of Unconventional Petroleum, Durham University