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Lecturer, Ethical Hacking and Defense, Edith Cowan University

Brianna O’Shea is a Lecturer in Ethical Hacking and Defense, Computing and Security, within the School of Science at Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia. She is an Adjunct Researcher at the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies at the University of Tasmania. Brianna received the Australian Postgraduate Award for her PhD study entitled, 'The Investigation and Prosecution of Cyberstalking in Australia'.

Her research interests focus on policing cybercrime and cyber-enabled crime and the human factors in cyber security. Her latest article is, ‘Holding the world to ransom: The top 5 most dangerous criminal organisations online right now’ in The Conversation.

In 2019, Brianna hosted the Microsoft AI Hackathon and judged the National Missing Persons Hackathon for the Australian Federal Police and Trace Labs.

She has delivered presentations, workshops, and professional development/training across the world for audiences including the International Conference on Cybercrime and Computer Forensics.

In 2022, Brianna received a scholarship to be part of the American Chamber of Commerce Global Leadership Academy (AmCham). She is currently studying Cybersecurity at Harvard University.

Brianna can be followed on Twitter (@BriannaOSheaPhD).

Experience

  • –present
    Lecturer, Ethical Hacking and Defense, Edith Cowan University
  • 2016–2018
    Teaching Fellow, Police Studies, University of Tasmania

Education

  • 2022 
    University of Tasmania, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Policing and Emergency Management
  • 2022 
    Harvard University, Premier Certificate, Cybersecurity
  • 2013 
    University of Tasmania, Bachelor of Arts with First Class Honours, Criminology
  • 2012 
    University of Tasmania, Bachelor of Behavioural Science, Psychology, Criminology and Behavioural Neuroscience

Publications

  • 2022
    Mapping cyber-enabled crime: Understanding police investigations and prosecutions of cyberstalking, International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy
  • 2019
    “Being a topic expert is not sufficient”: A mixed-method analysis of teaching dynamics at the Tasmania police academy, Police Practice and Research: An International Journal
  • 2019
    Challenges in policing cyberstalking: A critique of the stalking risk profile in the context of online relationships, Online Othering, Palgrave Studies in Cybercrime and Cybersecurity

Professional Memberships

  • Australian and New Zealand Forensic Science Society
  • Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology
  • Australian Women in Security Network
  • Australian Information Security Association
  • The Australia & New Zealand Society of Evidence Based Policing
  • American Chamber of Commerce Global Leadership Academy