Carmen S Christian

Lecturer in Economics, University of the Western Cape

Carmen Christian joined the Department of Economics at the University of Western Cape (UWC) in 2011, where she lectures economics and researches public health complexities from an economics perspective. Her understanding of public health issues is strengthened by her unique inter-disciplinary background in health sciences and economics.

Carmen holds numerous academic qualifications: she completed a BSc (Physiotherapy) at the University of Cape Town in 2003, an Advanced Diploma in Economic Policy at UWC in 2008, a BEcon (Hon) at UWC in 2010, a Master in Economics in 2014 at UWC – and is currently completing her PhD in Economics at Stellenbosch University. Her PhD explores demand-side drivers of poor tuberculosis outcomes in post-apartheid South Africa.

Having worked in both the private and public health sectors of South Africa, Carmen believes that her chosen career path will add value to society by impacting health policy - and ultimately health outcomes - for the better. Along with her academic contribution to the economic and health sector, she also works within local communities including being a mentor for the Allan Gray Orbis Foundation.

Experience

  • 2011–present
    Lecturer, University of the Western Cape

Education

  • 2015 
    University of the Western Cape, M. Econ cum laude
  • 2011 
    University of the Western Cape, B. Econ (Hon) cum laude
  • 2003 
    University of Cape Town, B.Sc (Physio) distinction in Movement Science

Publications

  • 2012
    Management in the South African public health sector: An x-inefficiency perspective., ​​Christian, Carmen Sue & Nicholas Crisp. Development Southern Africa 29(5): 725-737
  • 2012
    Exploring ways to improve health system performance in developing countries., Christian, Carmen Sue. (Book review). Development Southern Africa 29(5): 767-769

Professional Memberships

  • Member of iHEA (International Health Economics Association)
  • Member of IAFFE (International Association for Feminist Economics)