PhD Scholar, Interdisciplinary Humanities (Human Rights, Law and Gender), Australian National University

I am in the final stages of my doctoral thesis at the ANU, ‘They would rather have the women who are humbled – gendered citizenship and embodied rights in post-colonial Kenya’. Grounded in 13 months field work 2012 - 2013, and 2014; and using Kenyan women’s gender and citizenship rights as a focal point, I argue that human rights discourse creates particular kinds of recipients of rights, and often compels these subjects to inhabit their new, human rights based identities in limiting and problematic ways. I monitored the 2013 Kenyan General Election and have peer reviewed publications on the treatment and roles of women in Kenyan politics.

I have worked with a variety of human rights based organisations in research and policy development in Australia and sub Saharan Africa including the Australian Human Rights Commission, the Australian Migration and Refugee Review Tribunals, The Australian Govt. Department of the Attorney General; the Women’s Legal Centre (Cape Town) and the South African Human Rights Commission; the British Institute of Eastern Africa, and the Kenya Human Rights Commission. I hold BA (Hons I, English and Early Modern European History); LLB from Sydney University, I am admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of NSW.

Experience

  • –present
    PhD Scholar, Interdisciplinary humanities (Human Rights and Gender), Australian National University

Education

  • 2006 
    University of Sydney , LLB