Craig E. Franklin

Professor in Zoology, The University of Queensland

My lab investigates the physiological and behavioural responses of fish, frogs and reptiles to changing environmental conditions including assessing and predicting the impact of human-induced environmental change. A major thrust of this research is within the emerging field of Conservation Physiology. We are particularly interested in the capacity and plasticity of physiological systems (e.g. respiratory, cardiovascular, osmoregulatory, digestive and musculo-skeletal) to compensate and maintain performance under changing environmental conditions.

We combine lab-based experimental studies with fieldwork, and take an integrative approach that utilises ecological, behavioural, physiological and genomic methodologies. In the field we utilise remote sensing technology (acoustic and satellite telemetry, archival tags) to investigate the movement patterns and behaviours of animals in relation to environmental conditions.

Current projects include:

assessing the effects of increasing temperatures on sharks, frogs, turtles and crocodiles;
determining the physiological basis for the impact of increasing UV-B radiation on frogs;
diving behaviour and physiology of freshwater turtles and crocodiles;
acoustic and satellite tracking of sharks, turtles and crocodiles in Queensland;
regulation of physiological function in aestivating frogs

Experience

  • –present
    Professor in Zoology, The University of Queensland

Education

  • 1990 
    The University of Canterbury (NZ), Ph.D.