Henrik Schoenefeldt

Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture, University of Kent

Henrik is currently Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture at the Kent School of Architecture, University of Kent. His research interests are in contemporary low-energy architecture, in particular PassivHaus, architectural and engineering education, and in the environmental principles of historic buildings. Since 2012 the focus of his research has been on the design, development and performance of the historic ventilation system of the Houses of Parliament, but has also been leading research in low-energy design, which includes a post-occupancy evaluation of a PassivHaus certified house in Dulwich.

He completed his PhD at the University of Cambridge in summer 2011. He trained as an architect in the UK and Austria, and specialized in environmental design with an MPhil degree from Cambridge University. He developed a particular interest in the history of environmental design, which became the overarching subject of his PhD in Cambridge. His PhD was on the environmental design principles underlying the development glass structures in the 19th century, with a particular focus on the development of horticultural glasshouses and the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park (1850-51) and Sydenham (1852-54). His supervisor was Professor Alan Short. Despite the historical focus of the research, his architectural background remained very valuable. It provided him with the understanding required to analyse potentially significant technical and scientific aspects of building design that are frequently neglected by more conventional architectural historians with a specific art-historical training. He was able to combine historical research with detailed case studies of the scientific methods used in the design and the post-occupancy evaluation of buildings.

Henrik is strongly involved in teaching and curriculum development and is coordinator the technology and environment curriculum of the Master of Architecture Programme. He runs module within the MSc in Architecture and Sustainable Environmental, focusing on the study of historic environmental principles and technology. He also active research in architectural education. In 2012 he led a research project on the integration of sustainable design principles within the architectural studio, which was funded through a grant from the Higher Education Academy. His recent pedagogical initiative included a research project that involved a partnerships between practitioners in industry, academic researchers and post-graduate students and investigated the economic, technical and cultural challenges of delivering low-energy buildings in the UK, focusing on the PassivHaus standard.

Experience

  • 2011–present
    Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture, University of Kent

Education

  • 2011 
    University of Cambridge, PhD in Environmental Design in Architecture
  • 2007 
    University of Cambridge, M.Phil in Environmental Design in Architecture

Professional Memberships

  • Royal Institute of British Architects