Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Behavioural Medicine, St George's, University of London

Dr Erskine focuses on investigating the processes and consequences of avoidant coping, most notably thought suppression and repressive coping. Much of his work investigates why inhibitory processes often result in paradoxical effects extending to thought, emotion and behaviour.

Experience

  • 2013–present
    Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Behavioural Medicine, St George's, University of London

Publications

  • 2012
    Effect of thought suppression on desire to smoke and tobacco withdrawal symptoms, Psychopharmacology
  • 2012
    Behavioural, cognitive and affective consequences of trying to avoid thinking about chocolate, In Chocolate in Health and Nutrition
  • 2011
    The psychological effects of considering a move into residential care: An age-related study, Journal of Housing For the Elderly
  • 2011
    Thoughts on suppression: My own worst enemy: How trying not to think of an action might lead you down that very path, The Psychologist
  • 2010
    Effects of age on phenomenology and consistency of flashbulb memories of September 11 and a staged control event, Psychology and Ageing
  • 2010
    Effects of thought suppression on eating behaviour in restrained and non-restrained eaters, Appetite
  • 2010
    Resistance can be futile: Investigating behavioural rebound, Appetite
  • 2010
    I suppress therefore I smoke: The effects of thought suppression on smoking behaviour, Psychological Science
  • 2008
    Ageing, well-being and repressive coping, SIGNPOST - Journal of Dementia and Mental Health Care of Older People
  • 2007
    The predictors of thought suppression in young and old adults: Effects of anxiety, rumination and other variables, Personality and Individual Differences
  • 2007
    The prevalence of repressive coping style in younger and older adults, Aging and Mental Health
  • 2003
    Voluntary involuntariness: Thought suppression and the regulation of the experience of will, Consciousness and Cognition