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Rock Art Australia Ian Potter Kimberley Chair, The University of Western Australia

I am a Swedish archaeologist working in Australia on and off since 2000. I graduated at Umeå University in 2000 on a PhD thesis on north European rock art, and I have worked as a lecturer at Lund, Göteborg and Kalmar Univerisity College before I became professor of archaeology at Linnæus University in Sweden in 2009. Since 2012 I have participated and led research about Aboriginal rock art in western Arnhem Land and east Kimberley, including three ARC founded projects. 2020 I was appointed the Rock Art Australia Ian Potter Kimberley Chair, at the Centre of Rock Art Research + Management at the University of Western Australia.

Experience

  • 2020–present
    Professor , Rock Art Australia Ian Potter Kimberley Chair, University of Western Australia
  • 2009–2020
    Professor, Linnæus University, Sweden
  • 2006–2009
    Senior Lecturer, Kalmar University Colleage, Sweden
  • 2002–2006
    Reader , Göteborg University
  • 2001–2002
    Lecturer , Lund University, Sweden
  • 1997–2000
    PhD Scholarship, Umeå University, Sweden

Education

  • 2000 
    Umeå University, Sweden, PhD in Archaeology
  • 1993 
    Umeå University, Master in Archaeology

Publications

  • 2022
    Extraordinary back-to-back human and animal figures in the art of western Arnhem Land, Australia, Cambridge Journal of Archaeology, https://doi.org/10.1017/S0959774322000129
  • 2021
    The re-emergence of nganaparru (water buffalo) into western Arnhem Land life, landscape and rock art, Antiquity; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2021.107
  • 2021
    The Missing Macassans: Indigenous sovereignty, rock art and the archaeology of absence, Australian Archaeology 87(2): 127–143. https://doi.org/10.1080/03122417.2021.1932243.
  • 2021
    “Our dad’s painting is hiding. In secret place:” Reverberations of a 1972 rock painting episode in Kakadu National Park, Australia., Rock Art Research 38 (1), 59–69.
  • 2021
    “I have done hundreds of rock paintings:” Some recent rock art episodes among Samburu, northern Kenya, Cambridge Archaeological Journal 31(2): 229–246. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S095977432000044X
  • 2021
    Revisiting Francis Birtles’ painted car: Exploring a cross-cultural encounter with Aboriginal artist Nayombolmi at Imarlkba Gold Mine, 1929–1930. , History Australia; https://doi.org/10.1080/14490854.2021.1956336
  • 2020
    Children and rock art: A case study from western Arnhem Land, Australia. , Norwegian Archaeological Review 53 (1): 59–82. DOI: 10.1080/00293652.2020.1779802
  • 2020
    To bring back some eagleness to eagles: On bird worldings during the Bronze Age. , Current Swedish Archaeology 28: 47–73.
  • 2019
    Beyond the colonial encounter: Global approaches to contact rock art studies., Australian Archaeology 86 (2018/3): 210–218. https://doi.org/10.1080/03122417.2018.1562639
  • 2019
    Birds in the Bronze Age: A north European Perspective, Cambridge University Press
  • 2019
    Unfolding present and past (rock art) worldings, Time and Mind: The Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness and Culture 12 (2): 63–77.

Grants and Contracts

  • 2020
    Art at a crossroad
    Role:
    Principal Investegator
    Funding Source:
    Australian Research Council (SR200200062)
  • 2016
    History Places: Wellington Range rock art in global context
    Role:
    Principal Investegator
    Funding Source:
    Australian Research Council (SR200200062)