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Karen Vanderwolf

PhD Candidate, Trent University

I've been studying bats since 2006, first during my BSc honors thesis at Western, then my MSc thesis at the University of New Brunswick, then as Bat Conservation Specialist with the Canadian Wildlife Federation, and now during my Ph.D. thesis at Trent University. I've published 30 peer-reviewed articles, mostly about bats and white-nose syndrome, but also about other aspects of cave biology, mycology, and mammalogy.

Experience

  • –present
    PhD Candidate, Trent University
  • 2011–2020
    Research associate, New Brunswick Museum
  • 2011–2016
    Bat Conservation Specialist, Canadian Wildlife Federation
  • 2011–2011
    Conservation Intern, Nature Conservancy of Canada
  • 2008–2008
    Research and Teaching Intern, University of Maine at Fort Kent
  • 2006–2007
    Assistant Resource Manager, Ontario Parks
  • 2000–2002
    Research assistant, Western University

Education

  • 2012 
    University of New Brunswick, MSc Biology
  • 2007 
    Western University, BSc Biology

Publications

  • 2021
    Mycobiome traits associated with disease tolerance predict many western North American bat species will be susceptible to white-nose syndrome, Microbiology Spectrum
  • 2021
    Fungi associated with aeroponic roots in caves and mines of New Brunswick, Fungal Ecology
  • 2021
    Landscape genetic connectivity and evidence for recombination in the North American population of the white-nose syndrome pathogen, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, Journal of Fungi
  • 2021
    Hibernacula microclimate and declines in overwintering bats during an outbreak of white-nose syndrome near the northern range limit of infection in North America, Ecology and Evolution
  • 2021
    Skin fungal assemblages of bats vary based on susceptibility to white-nose syndrome, The ISME Journal
  • 2020
    Penicillium diversity in Canadian bat caves, including a new species, P. speluncae, Fungal Systematics and Evolution
  • 2019
    No change detected in culturable fungal assemblages on cave walls in Eastern Canada with the introduction of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, Diversity
  • 2018
    Growth media and incubation temperature alter the Pseudogymnoascus destructans transcriptome: implications in identifying virulence factors, Mycologia
  • 2018
    Geographic patterns of mercury bioaccumulation in bats across Canada: influence of atmospheric mercury deposition, Science of the Total Environment
  • 2018
    Malassezia vespertilionis sp. nov.: a new cold-tolerant species of yeast isolated from bats, Persoonia
  • 2017
    Psychrotolerant Microfungi Associated with Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) in a White-nose Syndrome-positive Bat Hibernaculum in Eastern Canada, Canadian Field-Naturalist
  • 2017
    Prelude to a panzootic: gene flow and continent-wide immunogenetic variation in northern Little Brown Myotis vulnerable to bat white nose syndrome, FACETS
  • 2017
    Hibernacula water chemistry and implications for hibernating bats, Journal of Mammalogy
  • 2017
    Fungus causing White-nose syndrome in bats accumulates genetic variability in North America with no sign of recombination, mSphere
  • 2016
    Using a novel partitivirus in Pseudogymnoascus destructans to understand the epidemiology of white-nose syndrome, PLoS Pathogens
  • 2016
    Lack of cave-associated mammals influences the fungal assemblages of insular solution caves in eastern Canada, Journal of Cave and Karst Studies
  • 2016
    Detecting viable Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae) from walls of bat hibernacula: effect of culture-media, Journal of Cave and Karst Studies
  • 2016
    Fungi associated with hibernating bats in New Brunswick caves: the genus Leuconeurospora, Botany
  • 2016
    Ectomycota associated with arthropods from bat hibernacula in eastern Canada, with particular reference to Pseudogymnoascus destructans, Insects
  • 2016
    Molecular detection of Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae) on big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) over-wintering in buildings, Journal of Wildlife Diseases
  • 2016
    . Fungi on white-nose infected bats (Myotis spp.) in Eastern Canada show no decline in diversity associated with Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae), International Journal of Speleology
  • 2015
    Fungi associated with over-wintering Tricolored bats, Perimyotis subflavus, in a white-nose syndrome region of Eastern Canada, Journal of Cave and Karst Studies
  • 2014
    Earthworm (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) occurrences from Anticosti Island (Quebec), Canada, Megadrilogica
  • 2014
    Clonal Expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans Genotype in North America Is Accompanied by Significant Variation in Phenotypic Expression, PLoS ONE
  • 2013
    A world review of fungi, yeasts and slime molds in caves, International Journal of Speleology
  • 2013
    Ectomycota associated with hibernating cave bats in eastern Canada prior to the emergence of white-nose syndrome, Northeastern Naturalist
  • 2012
    Bat populations and cave microclimate prior to and at the onset of white-nose syndrome in New Brunswick, Canadian Field-Naturalist
  • 2012
    Biogeographic and conservation significance of the occurrence of the Canadian endemic Maritime Shrew (Sorex maritimensis) in northern New Brunswick, Northeastern Naturalist
  • 2011
    Consumption of bats (Myotis sp) by raccoons (Procyon lotor) during an outbreak of white-nose syndrome in New Brunswick: implications for bat mortality estimates, Canadian Field-Naturalist