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Lecturer (Assistant Professor), King's College London

Dr Elizaveta Fouksman is a Lecturer (equiv. Assistant Professor) at the Centre for Public Policy Research at King's College London. She is also a research associate of the University of Oxford and the University of the Witwatersrand. Liz has a DPhil in International Development from the University of Oxford, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and has held research fellowships from the Leverhulme Trust, the Berggruen Institute and the Ford Foundation at (respectively) the University of Oxford, Harvard University and the University of the Witwatersrand.

Liz’s current project examines our moral, social and cultural attachment to wage labor, and the impediment such attachment poses for new imaginaries of the future of work and distribution in an increasingly automated world. In particular, Liz is investigating the ways unemployed welfare recipients in South Africa and Namibia link time-use, work, and income. Her research asks how such links challenge futurist calls for the decommodification of labor via mechanisms such as a universal basic income guarantee and/or shorter working hours.

Experience

  • 2019–present
    Reseach Associate, Society, Work and Development Institute (SWOP), University of the Witwatersrand
  • 2020–present
    Reseach Associate, African Studies Center, Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, University of Oxford
  • 2021–present
    Lecturer (Assistant Professor), Centre for Public Policy Research, King's College London
  • 2018–2021
    Research Fellow, St John's College, University of Oxford
  • 2018–2020
    Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, African Studies Center, Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, University of Oxford
  • 2017–2018
    Berggruen Fellow, Harvard University's Edmund J. Safra Center for Ethics
  • 2015–2017
    Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Society, Work and Development Institute (SWOP), University of the Witwatersrand

Education

  • 2015 
    University of Oxford, DPhil, MPhil in International Development