Matthew H. Holden

Lecturer, Centre for Applications in Natural Resource Mathematics, The University of Queensland

Dr Holden is a Lecturer and Research Fellow at the University of Queensland in the Centre for Applications in Natural Resource Mathematics and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions.

He develops quantitative approaches to solve challenging problems in environmental management. This includes how to cost effectively search for invasive species, save threatened species, protect natural ecosystems, and harvest fish sustainably. He is currently conducting the first ever stock assessment for Torres Straight coral trout and is also studying the dynamics of illegally harvested wildlife (e.g. elephants poached for ivory).


  • 2017–present
    Lecturer, The University of Queensland
  • 2015–2017
    Postdoctoral research fellow, The University of Queensland


  • 2015 
    Cornell University, PhD/Applied Mathematics


  • 2017
    High prices for rare species can drive large populations extinct: the anthropogenic Allee effect revisited, Journal of Theoretical Biology
  • 2017
    Academic conferences urgently need environmental policies, Nature Ecology & Evolution
  • 2016
    Human judgment vs. quantitative models for the management of ecological resources, Ecological Applications
  • 2016
    The economic benefit of time‐varying surveillance effort for invasive species management, Journal of Applied Ecology
  • 2016
    Elephant Poaching: Track the impact of Kenya's ivory burn, Nature
  • 2015
    Optimal escapement in stage-structured fisheries with environmental stochasticity, Mathematical biosciences
  • 2013
    Optimal Control and Cold War Dynamics between Plant and Herbivore, The American Naturalist
  • 2012
    Designing an effective trap cropping strategy: the effects of attraction, retention and plant spatial distribution, Journal of applied ecology

Professional Memberships

  • Resource Modeling Association
  • Society for Mathematical Biology
  • Society for Conservation Biology