Leader, Wild Canid Theme, IACRC, University of New England

My interest in, and enthusiasm for, ecological research was encouraged by work experience at Wallaby Creek, in north eastern NSW during my first year at university. Like the invasive animals that are now my primary research interest, I am a generalist. I strongly advocate the use of science, including analysis of human dimensions, to inform decisions about managing wildlife. Mentoring of younger scientists is also a passion and my objective is for them to always look for alternative explanations and set up experiments to test them; wildlife science is best served by investigating multiple working hypotheses. I am most satisfied when my PhD students and colleagues outstretch me and make me think. After 30 years experience in research and management of invasive species for agriculture and biodiversity protection, I realise there is so much more to know. I am a long-term member of the Australasian Wildlife Management Society, which has 'science in wildlife management' as its dictum.

Experience

  • 2010–present
    Adjunct Associate Professor, Animal Science, University of New England
  • 2012–present
    Leader, Wild Canid Theme, Invasive Animals CRC, University of New England
  • 2011–present
    Principal Research Scientist, Vertebrate Pests, Vertebrate Pest Research Unit, Biosecurity NSW

Education

  • 2005 
    University of Canberra, PhD, Applied Science
  • 1996 
    University of New England, M Resource Science

Research Areas

  • Invasive Species Ecology (050103)
  • Behavioural Ecology (060201)
  • Zoology (0608)
  • Ethology And Sociobiology (060304)
  • Veterinary Epidemiology (070704)
  • Animal Protection (Pests And Pathogens) (070205)
  • Wildlife And Habitat Management (050211)
  • Ecology (0602)
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