Reader in Astrophysics, University of Manchester

I am a Canadian astrophysicist, now Reader in Astrophysics and Director of Research for the School of Physics and Astronomy at The University of Manchester. I graduated from McGill University in 2009 and then moved to a three-year postdoctoral position at the University of Toronto. I also spent three years at the University of Southampton as a postdoctoral researcher and Lecturer.

Most of my research revolves around neutron star science. I am interested in using them as a tool to understand fundamental physics such as testing gravity theories, determining the properties of matter at extreme densities, investigating the evolution of binary systems, and probing the properties the interstellar and intergalactic space. Most of the data that I use are obtained with radio, near-infrared and optical telescopes, but I like to consider myself as an observed/applied theorist as a lot of my work sits somewhere between observational science and theory.

I am also very keen about public engagement and popular science. My journey toward professional astrophysics started as an amateur astronomer in my childhood. I have since then delivered countless public talks and I have involved with numerous activities giving me the opportunity to share my passion for science.

Experience

  • 2017–present
    Reader, The University of Manchester
  • 2014–2017
    Lecturer, The University of Manchester
  • 2013–2014
    Lecturer, University of Southampton

Education

  • 2009 
    McGill University, PhD in Astrophysics

Grants and Contracts

  • 2017
    Applying Astronomy Capability to Map an Invasive Weed: Leveraging Satellite Surveys to Inform "Famine Weed" Policy in Pakistan
    Role:
    Principal Investigator
    Funding Source:
    Science and Technology Facilities Council
  • 2016
    Fundamental Physics Using Black Widow, Redback and Transitional Pulsar Binaries
    Role:
    Principal Investigator
    Funding Source:
    European Research Council

Professional Memberships

  • Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society