Professor of health policy, University of York

Tim Doran qualified in biochemistry and medicine at the University of Edinburgh and subsequently trained in psychiatry and public health in the North West of England. He moved into academia in 2000, holding posts at the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester, and Harvard School of Public Health. As Professor of Health Policy at the University of York, Tim undertakes research into the impacts of health and social policies on health inequalities, and the effects and unintended consequences of quality improvement initiatives in health care.

Tim's main research interests are in the fields of health policy and health inequalities. This includes the wider social determinants of health and health inequalities, as well as the effectiveness of health care services. His current research programme is concerned with initiatives to improve the quality of care, particularly the use of financial incentives for health care providers, and the impact that these initiatives have on population health and health inequalities.

Current projects:

The Impact of Physician Incentives on Health Inequalities. Funded by the National Institute for Health Research, this project aims to gain a deeper understanding of the unintended consequences of physician incentive schemes and their effect on health care inequalities.

Quality Of Primary Care and Healthcare Outcomes And Utilisation For People With Serious Mental Illness. Funded by the National Institute for Health Research, this project aims to estimate the impact of quality of primary care for patients with serious mental illness on mortality, emergency admissions and healthcare utilisation.

Integrating Data On Health And Environment: New Spatial Modelling Approaches To Understanding And Tackling Mental Health Inequalities. Funded by the Wellcome Trust, this project aims to construct risk models for patient cohorts, estimating the age of onset, severity, progression and outcomes of key chronic mental health conditions, and the factors associated with this.

The Organisation and Delivery of 24/7 Healthcare. Funded by the National Institute for Health Research, this project aims to estimate the impact of changes to fully-operational hours in acute hospitals on access to services for different population and patient groups.

Supporting Policy Development And Evaluating Change: A Fast Response Analytical Facility. Funded by the Department of Health, this project aims to improve the quality of evidence upon which strategic health policy decisions are based, by providing expert advice, policy briefings and empirical and theoretical analysis.

Experience

  • –present
    Professor of health policy, University of York