PhD candidate, Macquarie University

I am a science communicator and astronomer. I currently investigate how the most massive stars in our galaxy are formed. I am also interested in how Indigenous peoples from around the world view the night sky. I have worked in science communication for nearly a decade. My goal is to share my passion for the night sky with others and to educate the public on science. I am also dedicated to improving the educational opportunities for those from disadvantaged backgrounds. I am a Maori descendent of the Ngati Whatua iwi of northern Aotearoa (New Zealand).

Experience

  • –present
    PhD Candidate, Macquarie University

Education

  • 2009 
    University of New South Wales, Master of Science
  • 2006 
    Michigan State University, Bachelor of Science

Publications

  • 2014
    Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteors in the M ̄aori astronomical traditions of New Zealand, WGN, the Journal of the IMO
  • 2014
    Organic Species in Infrared Dark Clouds, The Astrophysical Journal
  • 2013
    Characterisation of the MALT90 Survey and the Mopra Telescope at 90 GHz, Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia
  • 2013
    MALT90: The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz Survey, Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia
  • 2012
    The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey: NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) catalogues, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • 2012
    25 GHz Methanol Masers in Regions of Massive Star Formation, Proc. of the International Astronomical Union
  • 2011
    The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS) – I. Techniques and H2O maser data, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • 2011
    A Meteorite Crater in Palm Valley, Central Australia? A Preliminary Survey, Australian Space Sciences Conference Series
  • 2010
    High-velocity feature of the class I methanol maser in G309.38-0.13, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • 2009
    OGLE-2005-BLG-071Lb, the Most Massive M Dwarf Planetary Companion?, The Astrophysical Journal
  • 2006
    Discovery of a cool planet of 5.5 Earth masses through gravitational microlensing, Nature

Professional Memberships

  • American Astronomical Society
  • Astronomical Society of Australia