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Articles on Carbon sinks

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The growth in global carbon emissions has resumed after a three-year pause. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Fossil fuel emissions hit record high after unexpected growth: Global Carbon Budget 2017

After three years in which global carbon emissions scarcely rose, 2017 has seen them climb by 2%, as the long-anticipated peak in global emissions remains elusive.
March for Science, Washington, D.C., April 29, 2017. Shutterstock.com

Curbing climate change: Why it’s so hard to act in time

Why is it so hard to reach consensus about how to slow climate change? Multiple time lags get in the way: some make it hard to convey the risk, while others prolong the search for solutions.
Giant kelp can grow up to 60cm a day, given the right conditions. Joe Belanger/shutterstock.com

How farming giant seaweed can feed fish and fix the climate

In an extract from his new book, Tim Flannery explains how giant kelp farms could suck carbon dioxide from the air and store it in the ocean's depths, while encouraging species like fish and oysters.
Dry period in semi-arid central Australia. James Cleverly

Australia’s ‘great green boom’ of 2010-11 has been undone by drought

Extreme wet years are getting wetter and more common. This means Australia's terrestrial ecosystems will play a larger role in the global carbon cycle.
Mangroves are still be cleared for aquaculture expansion. Since 1989, 6600 hectares of Tanjung Panjang Nature Reserve’s original 13,300 ha of mangroves have been converted. Iona Soulsby

Indonesia’s vast mangroves are a treasure worth saving

Mangroves, hectare for hectare, store more carbon than any other forests. But they are also among the most threatened. New projects in Indonesia show how mangroves might be restored.
The swollen Fitzroy River in Queensland, Australia, where heavy rains in early 2011 led to extraordinary regrowth with a global impact. Capt. W. M. & Tatters/Flickr

Record rains made Australia a giant green global carbon sink

Record-breaking rains triggered so much new growth across Australia that the continent turned into a giant green carbon sink to rival tropical rainforests including the Amazon, our new research shows…

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